(Please remember to scroll down)
(Especially To See 4-H Summer Day Camps Info.)


FWC reminds scallopers
to stay safe in the water



FWC photo by Tim Donovan


Published June 14, 2018 at 3:38 p.m.
     NORTH FLORIDA
-- With the opening of scallop seasons fast approaching, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) wants to remind everyone engaged in this fun outdoor activity to use a divers-down warning device whenever they are snorkeling or scuba diving while searching for these tasty treats.


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     The divers-down symbol is rectangular or square and red in color with a white diagonal stripe. A divers-down flag displayed on a boat must be at least 20 inches by 24 inches and displayed at the highest point where it can be observed from 360 degrees around the vessel. A buoy may not be used or displayed from a vessel. A divers-down flag or buoy, displayed from the water, must be at least 12 inches by 12 inches. A flag must have a wire or other stiffener to hold it open, and a buoy may be three- or four-sided.
     All divers must prominently display a divers-down device in the area in which the diving occurs.
     “Displaying and understanding what constitutes a proper divers-down symbol are critical,” said Capt. Tom Shipp of FWC’s Boating and Waterways Section. “These safety devices are meant to alert boaters to the presence of people under the water’s surface and to give them plenty of room.”
     All vessels must make reasonable effort to stay at least 100 feet away from a divers-down device within a river, inlet or channel. In open waters, vessels must make reasonable effort to stay 300 feet away. For safety, divers should stay within those same distances of their displayed device. A vessel that approaches closer must be fully off plane and at idle speed.
     “Divers share the responsibility of boating safety with the boat operators,” Shipp said. “Diving without the divers-down symbol properly displayed or using it for reasons other than to inform others of the presence of divers is unlawful.” 
     The divers-down device should only be displayed when divers are in the water. When divers or snorkelers exit the water, it must be taken down.


Bird lover shares tips
on birding, photography


John Middleton begins his 90-minute PowerPoint presentation at the Williston Library the first Saturday in June. The mostly self-trained ornithologist, with only one class under his belt, shared his love of birds and nature at this free program, hosted by the Friends of the Williston Library.

Story and Photos
By Lisa Statham Posteraro
Published June 13, 2018 at 8:18 p.m.
     WILLISTON --
To “stir enthusiasm and gratitude” because we are “surrounded by so much beauty” is the goal of John Middleton, a passionate birder and photographer of nature.

 



This slide lists optional equipment for the birder…the ideal camera (VERY expensive!) and the actual camera John Middleton owns for taking an array of nature photographs. Weight is also an important factor when choosing a camera.


With his hand on his camera mounted on a tripod, John Middleton sports his ergonomically designed bag to go birding which would always include a snack and first aid kit; a water bottle would also be somewhere on his person.


     This former Florida Park Ranger, leadership consultant and pastor who grew up in Jacksonville drove from Lafayette County to share that passion in a recent program at the Williston Library which he called “Birds and Bird Photography: An Introduction.” The program was hosted by the Friends of the Williston Public Library (FOWL).
     Middleton shared some surprising statistics. He said 516 bird species live in Florida and 304 of those are in Levy County alone! The smallest bird is the ruby-throated hummingbird with a 3- to 4-inch wingspan. It can hover, fly backwards and lower its body temperature and heartrate to survive the night without food (nectar for energy and insects for protein). Prior to its 18- to 22-hourlong migration from Puerto Rico, this dynamo must build up its fat stores to allow for the four- to five-million wing beats required for the bird to get here! The largest bird is the American white pelican with its eight-foot to nine and a half-foot wing span. This species of bird is part of a cooperative feeding group.
      “Intricate” and “interdependent” are the two words Middleton used to describe nature; no living thing, flora or fauna, exists separate or independent from its environment. Also acknowledging his enthusiasm to learn, he also shared his take on how someone does learn. First, there is curiosity which leads to learning which leads to greater curiosity which leads to greater learning. This can “change moods” in people. He quoted Henry David Thoreau, who said, “It is not important what we look at…it is important what we see” that we may be transformed, become a little more “in awe.”
     Five topics were covered in the 90-plus minute presentation: ethics, equipment, techniques, locations, and learning about birds and photography. Critical to becoming a good birder/bird and nature photographer is ethics.
     “Making sure they and their environment are protected” is paramount, said Middleton. “We are losing songbirds” at an alarming rate, he noted, citing his belief that feral and outside cats as the primary culprits. Other “ethical” behaviors include respecting the laws intended to protect nature, avoiding nesting areas and ensuring feeders and other bird-friendly items are safe and clean.
     Deciding what equipment to procure requires awareness of bird behavior. Birds are usually small and far away and are active either early in the day or at dusk; both times are impacted by the availability of lighting. Binoculars are a must! (The first number is the magnification; the second indicates how much light can pass through the lens.) Middleton suggested purchasing the best quality you can afford. He also suggested light weight equipment for obvious reasons since the birder must carry all the equipment s/he needs. His current camera is a Nikon D500 with a Nikon 500 mm f4G ED (lens element)/VR (vibration reduction). And probably more important for the birder than the binoculars and camera are water, a snack and first aid items, he reminded the audience.
     Patience! That would be the #1 technique for the birder. And “don’t ignore the common,” said Middleton. Birds are everywhere! He shared a couple ideas: sit and wait (e.g. in a blind) or go on a walkabout. For both scenarios wearing the colors of nature is important. For the latter idea, hang to the side of the road as you stroll as quietly as possible through the area you’re exploring; maneuvering at an angle is a good idea as well.
     As for location, websites provide information about many areas in and around Levy County and the state. Check out floridabirdingtrail.com as well as cedarkeysaudubon.org. There are even birding apps for your phones.
     What’s the best tip if you want to learn about birding and bird photography? According to Middleton, “Go bird with other birders!”
     Programs hosted by FOWL will resume after the beginning of the 2018-19 school year. If you or someone you know has a topic you would like to share, we would be happy to have you; so please contact FOWL program coordinator Lisa Posteraro (352-339-1201 or levylisa51@aol.com) for more information.
     The Friends of the Williston Public Library send huge “Thank You” to our presenters during the 2017-18 school year: Derek Dykstra and friends (two- and four-legged) from the Santa Fe Teaching Zoo; Debra Segal, author of Idylwild Cowgirls, and her fellow cowgirls; and John Middleton, bird and nature lover extraordinaire.


Bay scallop season opens
June 16 in Dixie County
and a portion of Taylor County

FWC Map of Scallop Season 2018 on HardisonInk.com
This map shows some scallop season facts.

Story, Map and Photo
By Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Published June 12, 2018 at 3:08 p.m.

     DIXIE COUNTY -- The 2018 recreational bay scallop season for Dixie County and a portion of Taylor County opens June 16 and will remain open through Sept. 10.




FWC Photo of scallops underwater


     This includes all state waters from the Suwannee River to the Fenholloway River.
     “Each summer, thousands of Floridians and visitors come to our coastal communities for the world’s best scalloping," Gov. Rick Scott said. "With the opening of scallop season along with Florida’s abundant fishing opportunities, I am encouraging everyone to experience for themselves why Florida is the Fishing Capital of the World. This is a great time to get outside and enjoy the Gulf Coast’s beautiful waters, pristine beaches and world-class seafood.”
     “Harvesting bay scallops is a fun outdoor activity for the whole family,” said Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Chairman Bo Rivard. “The conservation of this species is important for recreation and the economics of these coastal areas.”
     Other 2018 Season Dates
     Additional bay scallop season dates for 2018 are as follows:
     ● St. Joseph Bay and Gulf County: Aug. 17 through Sept. 30. This region includes all state waters from the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County to the westernmost point of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County.
     ● Franklin County through northwestern Taylor County (including Carrabelle, Lanark and St. Marks): July 1 through Sept. 24. This region includes all state waters from the westernmost point of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County to Rock Island near the mouth of the Fenholloway River in Taylor County.
     ● Levy, Citrus and Hernando counties (including Cedar Key, Crystal River and Homosassa): July 1 through Sept. 24. This region includes all state waters south of Alligator Pass Daybeacon #4 near the mouth of the Suwannee River in Levy County to the Hernando – Pasco county line.
     ● Pasco County: A trial 10-day open season will occur July 20-29. This region includes all state waters south of the Hernando – Pasco county line and north of the Anclote Key Lighthouse in northern Pinellas County, and includes all waters of the Anclote River.
     These season dates are for 2018 only. In late 2018 or early 2019, the FWC will set the 2019 seasons for Gulf and Pasco counties, consider continuing the 2018 season structure for the remaining portions of the open scallop harvest area in 2019, and will work toward creating a more permanent season structure for 2020 and beyond.
     As the 2018 season moves forward, share your comments on what you would like to see for a future season structure at http://myfwc.com/SaltwaterComments. The FWC is very interested in understanding whether the public prefers regional differences in the season dates or a consistent season across the harvest area, as well as what season dates work best for various regions. Public feedback will be an important factor for determining whether further changes are needed when making a decision about the long-term season dates.


Log Cabin Quilters of Levy County
Column and Photo
By Myrtice Scabarozi © June 12, 2018 at 6:58 a.m.
     LEVY COUNTY –
The Log Cabin Quilters met Thursday (June 7) at the Levy County Quilt Museum -- 11050 N.W. 10th Ave. (near Levyville, kind of on the way to Judson on Levy County Road 134 from U.S. Alt. 27).
     Joining us on Thursday was Marlene from Butler, Penn. She usually drops by about twice a year and spends the day quilting. We really appreciate her help. We’re still waiting for her to move down here.
     We thought we had finished the quilt in the frame, and boy are we surprised to discover that it was only half finished.
     Correctional Officer Derek and the adult male inmates from Lancaster Correctional Institution were out this week. They were kept busy trying to get caught up with the weeds and grass. We fertilized everything a week or so before the rains started.
     Beads, lace and latch-hook items were brought in this week. Thanks for thinking of us, LCI.
     This week the yard looked great. A few years ago, we separated the bulbs in the soil next to the south end of the building. This year, the front and south side yards were filled with white blooms. Next year, should have even more blooms. I don’t know the name of the plants.

Levy County Quilt Museum HardisonInk.com Chiefland
Claire made this great quilt. It's very relaxing.


The flowers of summer. I wish we could have them all summer.


(F)Actor Theatre Company
and CF present
‘The Laramie Project’ July 20-22

Published June 7, 2018 at 7:18 p.m.
     OCALA --
The College of Central Florida’s Theatre Department will collaborate with (F)Actor Theatre Company to present “The Laramie Project,” Friday and Saturday, July 20-21, starting at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, July 22, at 3 p.m., in the Black Box Theatre located in the Dassance Fine Arts Center, 3001 S.W. College Road.
      “The Laramie Project” written by Moisés Kaufman and the Members of the Tectonic Theater Project, is about a 21-year-old gay student at the University of Wyoming who was the victim of assault outside of Laramie, Wyoming. Kaufman and the Tectonic Theater members have constructed a deeply moving theatrical experience from the 200-plus interviews with residents, some who were directly connected to the case.
     This show is directed by Janet Shelley from West Port High School’s Marion County Center of the Arts and is produced with special permission from Damatists Play Service. 
     Tickets are $10. Purchase your tickets early due to limited seating in the Black Box Theatre. For tickets and more information, call the CF Box Office at 352-873-5810 or visit www.tickets.cf.edu. The box office is located in the lobby of the Fine Arts Center and is open from 1-4 p.m. Monday through Thursday and is closed on Friday. Handicap accessible seating is available.


Hunter safety
Internet-completion courses
offered in Duval and
Levy counties in June


FWC Photo

Published June 6, 2018 at 2:08 p.m.
     TALLAHASSEE --
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering free hunter safety Internet-completion courses in Duval and Levy counties during June (list follows).
     Students who have taken the online course and wish to complete the classroom portion must bring the online-completion report with them.
     All firearms, ammunition and materials are provided free of charge. Students should bring a pen or pencil and paper. An adult must accompany children younger than 16 at all times.
     Anyone born on or after June 1, 1975, must pass an approved hunter safety course and have a hunting license to hunt alone (unsupervised). The FWC course satisfies hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces.
     The dates and times are:

     ● Duval County
June 14 (6 to 9 p.m.) and June 16 (8:30 a.m. until noon)

Jacksonville

     ● Levy County
June 24 (3 to 7 p.m.)
Williston
     The specific locations for these classes will be given to those who register in advance. Those interested in attending a course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at http://myfwc.com/HunterSafety or by calling the FWC’s regional office in Lake City at 386-758-0525.

 


Ocala car club boosts
Tri-County Cruisers’ contest


Vehicles roll into the Tri-County Cruisers’ Summer Car Show and Swap Meet at the Chiefland Farmers' Flea Market on Saturday (June 2).

Story, Photos and Video
By Jeff M. Hardison © June 3, 2018 at 3:38 p.m.
* Updated June 4, 2018 at 6:38 a.m.
     CHIEFLAND –
Several members of the Ocala Street Cruisers came to Chiefland Saturday (June 2) to compete in the Tri-County Cruisers’ Summer Car Show and Swap Meet at the Chiefland Farmers' Flea Market.

 

In this video, some of the Ocala Street Cruisers members arrive at the Chiefland Farmers’ Flea Market. John Mather, a 20-year member of the Tri-County Cruisers, is seen and heard welcoming ‘Mr. Jeff’ (HardisonInk.com Publisher Jeff M. Hardison).


Ann Spicer (left) and Dana Sheffield register contestants in the car show.









The engine in a 1964 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray reflects the car this car’s owner pays to the whole car – a classic.


This is a 1964 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray.


This 1934 vehicle is among the many that were on display at the car show.



This 2012 Limited Edition Yellow Jacket SRT8 Dodge Challenger is owned by Jorge Gonzalez of Ocala. This is his everyday car that he drives and it has 80,000 miles on it. Gonzalez a member of the Ocala Street Cruisers has a small exact model of his very car. This Yellow Jacket also has under its hood an autograph by Big Daddy Don Garlits from 2016. Donald Glenn ‘Don’ Garlits is an American race car driver and automotive engineer. He is considered the father of drag racing. The 86-year-old man is legendary and is known as ‘Big Daddy’ to drag racing fans around the world. (Here is a link to the Don Garlits Museum of Drag Racing - http://garlits.com/.) This particular Challenger is powered by a 392 cubic-inch hemi.




(Big Daddy Don Garlits signature is in there.)


Jorge Gonzalez holds the scale model before placing it as part of the car on show.




It is a Yellow Jacket.


Sonny's Pick and Best of Show are the biggest trophies.


Trophies!


Three of the Ocala Street Cruisers members prepare to register.


Among the female contingent of Ocala Street Cruisers on Saturday in Chiefland are (from left) Mary Jane Warrington, Kathy Doll and Cheryl Wilson.


The front of this 1972 Oldsmobile Cutlass, which is owned by Dave Warrington, shows some work done by Fast Trac Performance of Ocala.


There are also designating plaques from the Ocala Street Cruisers and Traction Masters of Alden, N.Y. Warrington said he is not only a member of the Ocala club, but he is still a member of the club where he participated when he lived in Buffalo, N.Y., before moving to Ocala five years ago.


     It was not only Ocala cars, trucks and other vehicles rolling into everyone’s favorite flea market in the Tri-County Area of Levy, Dixie and Gilchrist counties, but there were representatives from other places as well. Even with a potential for rain, and even with a slated rain date of June 9, the June 2 event went flawlessly.
     Owners of all makes, models and years of vehicles found the environment welcoming, and it was another great day for the Chiefland Farmers’ Flea Market and for the Tri-County Cruisers.
     Cash prizes and trophies were awarded, including the 3-foot tall Best of Show trophy, and the 3-foot tall Sonny's Pick Award, which is from Sonny Griffeth of the Chiefland Farmers' Flea Market.
     Several car show participants joined the other people in the Flea Market as well as they explored and bought things -- including food and drinks. And there was buying and selling and swapping of items at the event too.
     Meanwhile at the flea market, it was another great day for food, fun and deals galore from all four corners of that property. The flea market is an excellent place to shop for Weather King portable buildings as well.
     * The Tri-County Cruisers registered 46 vehicles, plus it had its club cars on display that they don’t count.
     In addition to the great turnout from the Ocala Street Cruisers, the Citrus County Geezers Hot Rod Non-Club (that’s their name) were well-represented, too, bringing eight cars.
     Three main trophies were given. Those winners were:
     ● People’s Choice -- Gary Hooper from Bell, 1934 Ford Sedan Delivery. (The red one pictured above.)
     ● Sonny’s Pick: Dave Blackshear from Lecanto, 1930 Ford Model A Coupe (Citrus County Geezers)
     ● Best of Show: Steve Metz from Ocklawaha, 1964 Chevy II Nova (Ocala Street Cruisers)
      There were 16 other trophies presented to winners of vehicles in other categories.

 


Water turtle crosses the road

This is one relatively large, freshwater softshell turtle.

Story, Photos and Video
By Jeff M. Hardison © June 1, 2018 at 3:38 p.m.
     LEVY COUNTY --
One giant softshell freshwater turtle was standing on Levy County Road 347 between Fowlers Bluff and Cedar Key on Thursday afternoon (May 31).

freshwater turtle big

Big freshwater turtle in Levy County
This turtle was about four-feet in diameter.



This turtle was about six-inches in diameter.



The small turtle is seen here making it from the center for the road into the grass. Due to oncoming traffic, its whole venture into the water was not captured on video, although the turtle was seen entering the water and disappearing below the surface on Thursday afternoon (May 31).

     Meanwhile, a few miles east, a very small freshwater turtle made its way across the road to the safety of grass and then back into the water where he disappeared.
     On the same day and the same stretch of road, three deer and two turkeys also made appearances for observant motorists who went by them.
     Motorists are reminded to be constantly vigilant and on the lookout. Always focus only on driving, because some other drivers may be speeding or going the wrong way in a lane of travel, and there are some pedestrians who wear dark clothing at night in unlit areas and do not walk facing traffic, and they even walk in the roadway where vehicles travel.


FWC set to conduct
aquatic plant control on
Lake Rousseau from June 4 - 15


FWC Photo of Lake Rousseau by Karen Parker of the FWC.

Published May 30, 2018 at 10:08 a.m.
     CITRUS-LEVY-MARION COUNTIES --
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is scheduled to conduct aquatic plant control on Lake Rousseau from June 4 through June 15, weather permitting.
     Lake Rousseau is part of the Withlacoochee River in Citrus, Levy and Marion counties, west of Dunnellon.
     Invasive hydrilla will be treated only in boat trails, but water lettuce and water hyacinth will be treated throughout the lake.
     Boat trails requiring hydrilla treatment to maintain navigation include River Retreats, Hamic Estates, Silver Lake and Old Mill trails. The shoreline adjacent to Marker 118 also will be treated.
     Biologists anticipate treating approximately 105 acres of hydrilla and 50 acres of water lettuce and water hyacinth with herbicides approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
     “There will be no restrictions on recreational activities, such as fishing or swimming, during the treatment period,” said Bruce Jaggers, an FWC invasive plant management biologist. “Any edible fish caught that are legal to keep may be consumed.” 
     There is a seven-day restriction on using water from treated areas for drinking or for animal consumption. However, there are no restrictions for other uses of treated water such as irrigating turf, ornamental plants and crops.
     Hydrilla is an invasive aquatic plant spread easily by boats throughout Florida’s lakes and rivers. While recreational anglers and waterfowl hunters may see some benefits from hydrilla, there are other potential impacts to consider including negative impacts to beneficial native habitat, navigation, flood control, potable and irrigation water supplies, recreation, and the aesthetic qualities of lakes. The FWC strives to balance these needs while managing hydrilla.
     Go to http://myfwc.com/WildlifeHabitats and click on “Invasive Plants” to find out more about invasive plant management, including “Frequently Asked Questions.”
     For more information, please contact Bruce Jaggers at 352-726-8622.

 


Church Thanks
Memorial Kitchen Builders


To those of you who helped with the Thelma McCain cook shed behind the Cedar Key Community Center, please accept a great big THANK YOU! When we lost Thelma a year ago, we knew there had to be a way to honor her many contributions to the community, especially her concern that everyone in Cedar Key be well cared for and be well fed. That led to Henry Coulter’s idea to build a cook shed behind the center, so that anyone using the center would have a place to cook for large crowds. After the city waived the fees, so many of you stepped up to help with financing and construction. Thank you to the churches, the banks, the community organizations, the businesses and thank you to the individuals who gave tirelessly of their time. Without all of you, this memorial to Thelma would not have been possible.
Published May 30, 2018 at 9:28 a.m.

Information and Photo Provided by Karen Voyles on Behalf of Christ Episcopal Church

 

 



Free Nature Coast Fishing
for Youth program hosted
this summer in Cedar Key;

Advance registration required

FWC photo by Amanda Nalley

Published May 18, 2018 at 10:08 p.m.
     CEDAR KEY --
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free Nature Coast Fishing for Youth program in Cedar Key for youth between the ages of 5 and 15.
     Programs will be held every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., beginning June 5 and extending through July 26, at the Senator George G. Kirkpatrick Marine Laboratory, 11350 S.W. 153rd Court.
     Advance registration is required; no walk-ins will be accepted.
     All participants of the free program will learn fishing basics, the importance of habitats to fish species, proper fish handling and release techniques, and fish identification. Participants will spend time fishing on-site.
     An adult chaperone is required to attend the entire program with children age 8 and under. Youth and chaperones should bring their own lunch, sunscreen, hat and any personal fishing gear desired, although fishing gear will be provided for those who need it. Upon completing the program, participants will receive a rod and reel donated by Fish Florida.
     For details and to pre-register, contact Hannah Healey at 352-543-1079 or Hannah.Healey@MyFWC.com.


 


2018 Levy County 4-H Summer
Day Camps open for registration

By Genevieve Mendoza
Levy County 4-H Campers Development Agent
Published May 6, 2018 at 10:08 p.m.
     LEVY COUNTY --
Levy County 4-H is excited to announce the 2018 Summer Day Camp schedule.
     These day camps are open to children from any county and the children do not have to be members of 4-H.
     Day Camps will be hosted all summer on a wide variety of topics. Below are the camp descriptions. After deciding which camps your child would like to attend, please go to Eventbrite to register and pay.
     Click HERE to register and pay.
     Please remember that registering for one camp does not register your child for camp all summer. Please remember, too, that there are a limited number of spaces. Some Summer Day Camps filled last year, and some people were unable to register because the camp was full.
~~~
WEEK 1 - June 11 through 14
AG Discovery - Beef and Dairy

     During this camp, campers will discover how beef and dairy products make their way from the farm to the kitchen table. Campers will explore through daily field trips to local farms and processing sites. They will also learn some unique and tasty ways to include beef and dairy products in their meals. At the same time that youth are mastering these skills, they are also gaining valuable life skills such as independence, decision-making, leadership, and responsibility.
AGES: 9-12
COST: $40. Registration closes June 1 at 11:59 p.m. Forms Due June 4 at 4 p.m.
-- OR --
Clover Kids Camp - Discovering 4-H - June 11 through 14
     Learn by doing is an important slogan and philosophy of the 4-H program. During this camp, the Clover Kids will be introduced to the incredible world of 4-H through creative arts, games, outdoor activities, and other science-based projects. At the same time, they are mastering these skills, they are also gaining valuable life skills such as independence, decision-making, leadership, and responsibility.
AGES: 6-8
COST: $40. Registration closes June 1 at 11:59 p.m. Forms Due June 4 at 4 p.m.
~~~
WEEK 2- June 25 through 28
Backyard Water Ventures

     During this camp, these campers will discover how to protect and enjoy our world’s most important natural resource -- water! Campers will explore through daily field trips to local waterways and treatment facilities to learn more about how they can play an important role in preserving water resources. At the same time that youth are mastering these skills, they are also gaining valuable life skills such as critical thinking, decision-making, leadership, and responsibility.
AGES: 10-12
COST: $40 Registration Closes June 15 at 11:59 p.m. Forms Due June 18 at 4 p.m.
-- OR --
Clover Kids Camp - Outdoor Adventures - June 25 through 28
     During this camp, Clover Kids will discover how to protect and enjoy the Nature Coast's wildlife. Campers will explore through daily field trips to local aquaculture farms and wildlife habitat sites. They will learn unique and tasty ways to include fish and seafood in their meals. At the same time that youth are mastering these skills, they are also gaining valuable life skills such as critical thinking, decision-making, leadership, and responsibility.
AGES: 6-8
COST: $40 Registration Closes June 15 at 11:59 p.m. Forms Due June 18 at 4 p.m.
~~~
WEEK 3 - July 9 through 12
Fishing FUNdamentals

     During this camp, campers will fish for knowledge as they discover the fun and exciting world of fishing sports. Campers will explore through daily field trips and will learn useful and unique ways to be good stewards while enjoying the outdoors as budding anglers. At the same time that youth are mastering these skills, they are also gaining valuable life skills such as personal safety, critical thinking, leadership, and responsibility.
AGES: 8-12
COST: $40 Registration Closes June 28 at 11:59 p.m. Forms Due June 29 at 4 p.m.
-- OR --
Wilderness Explorers - July 9 through 12
     During this camp youth will discover how to protect and enjoy our local wildlife and natural resources. Campers will explore through daily field trips to local state parks and wildlife reserves. They will also learn some basic survival skills to stay safe while enjoying the outdoors. At the same time that youth are mastering these skills, they are also gaining valuable life skills such as personal safety, critical thinking, leadership, and responsibility.
AGES: 8-12
COST: $40 Registration Closes June 28 at 11:59 p.m. Forms Due June 29 at 4 p.m.
~~~
WEEK 4 - July 16 through 19
4-H Citizenship Discovery Camp

     During this camp youth will learn more about their local government and experience the political process first-hand. Campers will visit with various public offices through daily field trips and see their local government officials in action. At the same time that youth are mastering these skills, they are also gaining valuable life skills such as critical thinking, generosity, leadership, and responsibility.
AGES: 10-12
COST: $40 Registration Closes July 6 at 11:59 p.m. Forms Due July 9 at 4 p.m.
-- OR --
4-H Archery Camp - July 16 through 19
     This camp is an exploratory program into the sport of archery. During this camp youth will learn about safety and the rules of an archery range, the basics of shooting technique, and get an introduction to competition in a fun and engaging environment. Campers will also explore through daily field trips how bows are made and how to construct their own archery quiver and wrist guard. At the same time that youth are mastering these skills, they are also gaining valuable life skills such as critical thinking, decision-making, leadership, and responsibility.
AGES: 8-12
COST: $40 Registration Closes July 6 at 11:59 p.m. Forms Due July 9 at 4 p.m.
~~~
WEEK 5 - July 23 through 26
AG Discovery - Honey and Peanuts

     During this camp youth will discover how honey bees and peanut growers work together to bring their products from the farm to your kitchen table. Campers will explore through daily field trips to local farms and processing sites. They will also learn some unique and tasty ways to include honey and peanuts in their meals. At the same time that youth are mastering these skills, they are also gaining valuable life skills such as independence, decision-making, leadership, and responsibility.
DATES: July 23-26
AGES: 8-12
COST: $40 Registration Closes July 13 at 11:59 p.m. Forms Due July 16 at 4 p.m.
-- OR --
Marine and Aquatic Science Explorations - July 23 through 26
     During this two-week camp, campers will discover how to protect and enjoy the Nature Coast's wildlife. Campers will explore through daily field trips to local aquaculture farms and wildlife habitat sites. They will also learn some unique and tasty ways to include fish and seafood in their meals. At the same time that youth are mastering these skills, they are also gaining valuable life skills such as critical thinking, decision-making, leadership, and responsibility.
AGES: 8-12
COST: $40 Registration Closes July 13 at 11:59 p.m. Forms Due July 16 at 4 p.m.
~
     We are very excited about all of the opportunities we are offering this summer. Please note that space is limited, so register early. The ages for campers MUST be the age listed by June 1st unless otherwise stated. All camps have strict enrollment limits and increased late fees, so sign up soon. Camp fees are non-refundable and include breakfast, lunch, field trips, and recreation each day. As a reminder all day camps, prices, and class sizes are subject to change. Please join us as we have fun and learn at the 2018 Levy County 4-H Day Camps!
     Don’t forget you can still sign up for our away camp too -- Camp Cherry Lake.
~~~
CAMP CHERRY LAKE
     Each summer, young people in Levy County pack their bags to spend four days and four nights away from home at Camp Cherry Lake in Madison, Florida. This year, from June 18 through June 22 your child will have the opportunity to learn in a fun and exciting outdoor environment!
     Campers ages 8 to 13 will have the opportunity to learn kayaking, canoeing, archery, arts and crafts, swimming, and so much more. At the same time that youth are mastering these skills, they are also gaining valuable life skills such as independence, decision-making, leadership, and responsibility.
     Camp attendance is on a first-come, first-served basis and spots will NOT be reserved. We are in a cohort with Alachua County, Citrus County, Dixie County and Gilchrist County 4-H Clubs, so register early to guarantee your spot!
     There will be a Parent Meeting and Camper Orientation/ Camp Counselor-Led Meet and Greet held at the Levy County Extension Office on June 1, 2018 at 6 p.m.
     Please call the Levy County 4-H Office if you have any questions, 352-486-5131.
     Anyone who has questions about Levy County 4-H Summer Camps should call Levy County 4-H Campers Development Agent Genevieve Mendoza at 352-486-5131. She is the best source for correct information about Levy County 4-H.

 


Appleton Museum of Art
offers summer camp options

Published March 5, 2018 at 1:18 p.m.
    OCALA --
The Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, is scheduled to offer 17 weeklong summer art camps for students aged 4 years and older; and two-week pottery camps for children ages 7 to 12 and teens.
     Enrollment begins April 2 at http://appletonmuseum.org/.
     One-week camps cost $95 for Appleton members and $115 for nonmembers. Two-week camps cost $175 for Appleton members and $210 for nonmembers. For more information, contact Hollis Mutch at 352-291-4455, ext. 1613, or mutchh@cf.edu.
June 4-8
ECO-Art: Ages 7-12, 9 a.m.-noon
Art, nature and recyclables – it’s a winning combination for the creative mind. Use your imagination to create art pieces with natural and recycled materials.
Meet the Masters: Ages 4-6, 9 a.m.-noon
Through art and stories, pint-sized Picassos will be introduced to a new artist each day and experience a variety of materials to create inspired works of art.
Fashion Fun: Ages 7-12, 1-4 p.m.
It’s all about fashion accessories. Learn different techniques to decorate a scarf, hat and bag. Practice your drawing skills as you sketch outfits from your imagination, just like professional designers.
~
June 11-15
Behind the Scenes: Ages 7-12, 9 a.m.-noon
We’re partnering with the Ocala Civic Theatre to paint backdrops and props for a summer production. Read through the script and learn what it takes to create a set. Three complimentary tickets to the performance are included with each enrollment in this camp.
Painting Possibilities: Ages 11+, 1-4 p.m.
Spend a week focusing on acrylic painting and bring out inner creativity you never knew you had.
Asian Fusion: Ages 7-12, 1-4 p.m.
Tour the museum’s Asian Gallery and discover the beauty and design across several cultures. Then, create 2-D and 3-D works of art influenced by the masterful art and objects in this collection.
~
June 18-22
Cat Fancy: Ages 7-12, 9 a.m.-noon
Can you name five fun facts about cats? Look at artists’ interpretations of the cat and create a variety of cat-themed works of art.
Doggone Days: Ages 7-12, 1-4 p.m.
This week won’t be “RUFF.” You’ll have a howling good time making art about man’s best friend.
Meet the Masters: Ages 4-6, 1-4 p.m.
Through art and stories, pint-sized Picassos will be introduced to a new artist each day and experience a variety of materials to create inspired works of art.
~
July 9-13
Rad Reptiles: Ages 7-12, 9 a.m.-noon
Guess what? Reptiles are cool! This week will be full of colorful, snapping and slithering art-filled fun.
Crazy about Color: Ages 4-6, 1-4 p.m.
This multimedia camp is designed to inspire your imagination and awareness of color.
~
July 9-20 (two-week camp)
Dig into Clay Jr.: Ages 7-12, 1-4 p.m.
Learn the basics of hand building and glazing in this two-week camp. It’s clay every day.
~
July 16-20
Back in Time: Ages 7-12, 9 a.m.-noon
Become a time traveler and discover different eras, making them come alive again through your artwork. Explore cave painting and then paint on stone – and much more.
Rock ’n’ Roll Art: Ages 7-12, 1-4 p.m.
Our special exhibition “Medieval to Metal: The Art & Evolution of the Guitar” is all about guitars. Let it inspire you to create artwork that’s music to your eyes and ears.
~
July 23-27
Folk Art: Ages 7-12, 9 a.m.-noon
Learn about the decorative arts across a variety of cultures and what makes them special. You’ll create a variety of unusual and fun works of art.
Brickworks: Ages 7-12, 1-4 p.m.
Design it. Create it. Wreck it. Repeat! Explore the fundamental principles of engineering and design using the ARTSpace’s LEGO collection.
~
July 23-August 3 (two-week camp)
AppleTEENS Clay: Ages 12+, 1-4 p.m.
This camp is all about wheel throwing, building, glazing and discovering the fun of clay to make amazing works of art! Learn to throw on a pottery wheel and how to combine it with unique hand-building techniques, while exploring how glazes can make a simple piece spectacular.
~
July 30-August 4
Wonky Sculptures: Ages 7-12, 9 a.m.-noon
It’s all 3-D this week! Walk the museum’s sculpture garden and see how artists design and build sculptures, then create your own monumental works of art.
A Week at the Beach: Ages 7-12, 1-4 p.m.
You don’t need sunblock for this camp that will combine what you see, feel and do at the beach all into fun works of art created right here at the museum!

 


Bingo in Yankeetown
on Thursday nights

Published Dec. 13, 2017 at 10:37 p.m.
     YANKEETOWN --
Come join our Thursday Night Bingo at the Yankeetown-Inglis Woman’s Club at 7 p.m.

     These Bingo games are open to the public, however there is no indoor smoking allowed.
     Doors open at 6 p.m. to buy cards for $1 each and enjoy some of the best food and homemade desserts from the kitchen. Bring in two non-perishable items for Yankeetown School and you’ll receive a free Early Bird Special.
     Here’s what they need; individual cereal and juice boxes, instant oatmeal, bowls and spoons.
     Get your daubers ready and we’ll see you at the YIWC Club, 5 56th St., Yankeetown each Thursday.
     All proceeds from Bingo go to fund scholarships for local students. You’re giving back to the community in many ways when you grab your friends and neighbors and join the fun that is BINGO. Email:  yiwomansclub@gmail.com or call 352-447-2057.

--UPDATED--
TUESDAY  JUNE 19  8:08 a.m.
Levy, Dixie and Gilchrist counties







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