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Yankeetown boat ramp open for launches
Tuesday afternoon view
This view across a salt marsh looking toward the Gulf of Mexico is in a little pull-through driveway on the side of Levy County Road 40 a bit before the boat ramp and park. On Tuesday, there was an old, rusty small smoker as well as a bicycle that appeared to be abandoned, tucked away but relatively easily visible in the nearby underbrush.

Story and Photos
By Jeff M. Hardison © Aug. 11, 2022 at 8:12 a.m.
     YANKEETOWN –
The public boat ramp at the end of Levy County Road 40 (Follow That Dream Parkway) late Tuesday afternoon (Aug. 9) was relatively empty.



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     During the weekends, this area can be full of parked vehicles with boat trailers attached to them.

Tuesday afternoon view
Big birds sit on branches on a small island in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast from Yankeetown.

Tuesday afternoon view
A seagull helps a photographer create a striking photograph as it glides by in the air.

Tuesday afternoon view
An Anhinga spreads its wings as it stands on driftwood poking up from the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Yankeetown late Tuesday afternoon.

Tuesday afternoon view

Tuesday afternoon view
Evidence of failed casts by fishermen using poles is seen on wires near the boat ramp.

Tuesday afternoon view

Tuesday afternoon view
Clouds are seen in the area late Tuesday afternoon.


Tuesday afternoon view
A bird flies over a visitor to the Yankeetown area on Tuesday afternoon.

Tuesday afternoon view
The Crystal River nuclear-powered electric generating plant is not active anymore. A siren that would have alerted people about danger if something bad happened at the nuclear plant remains near the Levy County park and boat ramp at the end of Levy County Road 40 West.

 


Camp Valor progresses
Elvis show kicks off 2-day Vet Fest 2022

Vet Fest 2022
Gilchrist Prevention Coalition (GPC) Treasurer Alesha Smith stands near one of the big graphic displays to show Camp Valor. Smith not only serves as the volunteer treasurer, but she volunteers to be among the members of the Planning Committee of ForVets. The GPC helps people prevent the abuse of drugs.

Story and Photos
By Jeff M. Hardison © Aug. 6, 2022 at 4:12 p.m.
Updated Aug. 10, 2022 at 2:12 p.m.
     GILCHRIST COUNTY
– Vet Fest 2022 started with an Elvis show and lasagna dinner on Friday night (Aug. 5) and it culminated with vendors at Otter Springs Park and Campground on Saturday (Aug. 6).

     The lasagna dinner and Elvis show were a big hit Friday night as award-winning Elvis Impersonator Jimmy Fields put on the Elvis GI Blues Show from 7 to 9 p.m. 
     The Vet Fest event on Saturday at Otter Springs Park and Campground, 6470 S.W. 80th Ave., near Trenton, was a bit toned down from original plans, where food truck owners changed their minds about showing up.
     Proceeds from the weekend events at Vet Fest 2022 went to the benefit of the Camp Valor project.
     Otter Springs Park and Campground Manager and Camp Valor Chief Operating Officer Debbie Destin on Saturday said she is pleased to announce the septic system required to start Camp Valor is being built, and construction on Camp Valor itself is soon to start.
     During Vet Fest 2022, there were opportunities to see the layout and an artist’s rendition of Camp Valor.
     There were many vendors at the event this year, and next year’s Vet Fest 2023 is slated for the first Saturday in August.

Vet Fest 2022
Gilchrist Prevention Coalition Executive Director Robert Wells mans the table for the GPC, which helps in the prevention of drug abuse in Gilchrist County. He provided visitors with information, both in writing and verbally, and he gave away promotional items of ink pens, sticky memo pads, cups and candy. There was also a 50-50 drawing at the GPC table, with proceeds going to help Camp Valor.


     Park Manager Destin said she is thankful for all of the vendors who came this year, as well as the guests and donors during this event, and she is especially grateful for the work put in by Gilchrist Prevention Coalition Executive Director Robert Well.
     Wells opened the event Saturday morning with a prayer and he led the people present in the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America.

Vet Fest 2022
Face-Painter Crystal ‘Nana’ Huber stands with one of the paint brushes she uses in her art. Huber owns Nana’s Funny Face Painting, and she was on hand ready to paint faces at Vet Fest 2022. In the background are Debbie Destin, top event coordinator, park manager and more, and Robert Wells of the Gilchrist Prevention Coalition. Caring. Hope Health. – That’s the Gilchrist Prevention Coalition.

Vet Fest 2022
Vet Fest 2022 is a family-oriented event. Here is one of the vendors with her family who joined her Saturday. They are all from Hillsborough County. Seen here are (from left) grandson Matthew Molesy, 16, grandmother and face-painter Crystal ‘Nana’ Huber (of Nana’s Funny Face Painting), granddaughter Zoey Stevens, 12, and grandfather David Huber.

Vet Fest 2022
Robert Wells welcomes everyone to the event as he urges people to buy things from vendors who are selling them. He mentioned that all of the vendors would receive a free Vet Fest tee-shirt, and that those tee-shirts cost $10 for anyone else.

Vet Fest 2022
Daughter and father duo Terri McIntyre with the python Snaky, and Ray McIntyre with the python Thor. Ray McIntyre is the maintenance man at Otter Springs Park and Campground. He brought six of the 13 Bald Pythons he owns, including Thor – an Albino Bald Python. He has a wide range of different mutations of the Bald Python. The father-daughter team were at the event to help people learn more about snakes, and that these reptiles are not all bad.

Vet Fest 2022
Ray McIntyre holds Thor – a young Albino Bald Python.

Vet Fest 2022
The domestic violence and rape crisis center named Another Way was a vendor at this event. Seen here from Another Way are Amanda Silcox (left), the sexual violence outreach coordinator for Dixie and Gilchrist counties, and Samantha Scott, the domestic violence outreach coordinator for Dixie and Gilchrist counties.

Vet Fest 2022
The Tri-County DAV Chapter 63 had three of its representatives at Vet Fest 2022. Seen here are (from left) Commander Larry Foland, Senior Vice Commander Ken Bamberger and Treasurer George Wood.

Vet Fest 2022
Sophia Hampson, 11, of Gainesville is the youngest entrepreneur at the 2022 Vet Fest. Beauty Beads By Sophia, Bracelets and More, is in its second year. Sophia’s mother, Joy Hampson, was a vendor at this year’s event, too. Joy was selling kitchen utensils, tools, cutlery and the like that are of The Pampered Chef brand. Sophia Hampson has bought a television, a tablet and a cotton candy-making machine, her mother said, from her earnings via Beauty Beads By Sophia. Joy said her other two daughters, Samantha and Sabrina, are supportive of their sister and they ‘love to help Sophia spend money.’

Vet Fest 2022
Marianne Medley of Old Town (left) owns Mare’s Minerals. She sells rocks in the native state as well as polished, and she sells her handmade jewelry. In this scene here, Davonte McCutheon, 16, of Chiefland (center) and Lauren Cabeza, 24, also of Chiefland, select from the rocks that Medley was giving away for free from the ’free bowls of rocks’ area of her display. (One visiting journalist chose an amethyst in its raw form. amethyst is a violet-colored variety of quartz. Amethyst is a semi-precious stone. Many semi-precious stones are rarer than precious stones. The term 'semi-precious stone'" does not mean that it is less beautiful than a precious stone.) As for the two people selecting their free stones, 
McCutcheon was a volunteer that day, helping Cabeza distribute free tee-shirts to vendors. Cabeza was putting in voluntary time, too, in tee-shirt distribution. She also serves the ForVets Planning Committee.

Vet Fest 2022
Present at the Vet Fest 2022 event, too on Saturday, were (from left) Jane Phipps, Marquise Fuce, Charnice W. Johnson and Carmen Roberts. These four ladies are part of the Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) Program. The Gainesville SSVF provides supportive services for veterans and veteran families with low or no income. To qualify for the program, the participant must be a veteran who was discharged under conditions other than dishonorable. Furthermore, the participant must be homeless or in danger of becoming homeless; and meet income guidelines. The Gainesville Volunteers of America Florida SSVF Program serves Alachua, Bradford, Gilchrist, Levy and Putnam counties. To learn more about this program, click HERE.

Vet Fest 2022
Eric Zimmer, veterans affairs specialist with the College of Central Florida, was present at the Vet Fest 2022 and he was ready, willing and able to help veterans know all about veteran services at CF. He does not do this single-handedly. He has assistants and they help vets, too.

 


Learn how to be alligator aware
I am an alligator and I have my eye on you Chomp Chomp
Avoid conflicts with alligators.

Story and Photos Provided
By FWC Communications
Published July 29, 2022 at 3:12 p.m.
     TALLAHASSEE –
With summer in full swing, many people are working and recreating near Florida’s lakes, rivers and wetland areas.

I am an alligator Leave me alone I like to lie on this log and pretend you cannot see me Chomp Chomp
Avoid conflicts with alligators.

     Warm temperatures mean alligators are more active and visible. While serious injuries caused by alligators are rare in Florida, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) recommends taking the following precautions when in and around the water to prevent conflicts with alligators:
     ● Keep a safe distance if you see an alligator.
     ● Never feed an alligator. When fed, alligators can lose their natural wariness and instead learn to associate people with the availability of food. This can lead to dangerous circumstances for yourself and other people who could encounter the alligator in the future.

 


Feeding alligators is illegal and dangerous in Florida. If you see someone feeding an alligator, call FWC’s Wildlife Alert at 888-404-FWCC or visit MyFWC.com/WildlifeAlert, by clicking HERE.



     ● Swim only in designated swimming areas during daylight hours. Alligators are most active between dusk and dawn.
     ● Keep pets on a leash and away from the water’s edge and never let them swim in fresh or brackish water even for short periods of time. Pets often resemble alligators’ natural prey. Allowing your pet in the water for even short periods to cool off or play can result in its death.
     ● Call the FWC’s Nuisance Alligator Hotline at 866-FWC-GATOR(866-392-4286) if you believe an alligator poses a threat to people, pets or property and the FWC will dispatch a contracted nuisance alligator trapper to resolve the situation. The FWC places the highest priority on public safety and administers a Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program (SNAP) to proactively address alligator threats in developed areas, while conserving alligators in areas where they naturally occur.
     ● Find more resources about living with alligators by clicking HERE
     The American alligator, Florida’s state reptile, is a conservation success story. Florida has a healthy and stable alligator population, which is estimated at 1.3 million alligators of every size. They are found in freshwater lakes, ponds, swamps and slow-moving rivers in all 67 counties in Florida.

 


Log & report harvested wild turkey & deer
New rule - no exclusions from reporting

FWC hunt rules
Story and Art
By FWC Communications
Published July 29, 2022 at 11:12 a.m.
     TALLAHASSEE --
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission announced on July 29 that there are new rules for turkey and deer hunters to report the animals they harvest.
     All hunters (including those under 16 years of age, resident hunters 65 years old and older, military personnel on leave for 30 days or less, and those hunting on their homestead in their county of residence must (Step 1) log their harvested deer and wild turkey prior to moving it from the point where the hunter located the harvested animal, and (Step 2) report their harvested deer and wild turkey within 24 hours.
     Hunters must report harvested deer and wild turkey: 1) within 24 hours of harvest, or 2) prior to final processing, or 3) prior to the deer or wild turkey or any parts thereof being transferred to a meat processor or taxidermist, or 4) prior to the deer or wild turkey leaving the state, whichever occurs first.
     Remember, turkey hunters, a new rule takes effect this fall that requires all hunters (even those exempt from license requirements) to log and report wild turkeys they harvest. This new rule applies to spring and fall wild turkey seasons. 
     The FWC also reminds all deer hunters (even those exempt from license requirements) they must log and report harvested deer.
     Upon harvesting a deer or wild turkey, all hunters must: a) log their harvest prior to moving it from the point where they located it and b) report it within 24 hours of being harvested.
     Hunters can log and report their harvest using the FWC’s Fish|Hunt Florida App or at GoOutdoorsFlorida.com. Hunters can also log their harvest using a paper harvest log and report via the phone by calling 888-486-8356 (888-HUNT-FLORIDA). 
Learn more about deer and wild turkey harvest reporting and download and print a paper harvest log at MyFWC.com/HarvestReport.
     The FWC appreciates hunters' support of conservation by adhering to harvest reporting requirements. Harvest reporting can help foster bag limit compliance and gives FWC biologists another valuable source of harvest information to help them manage deer and wild turkey populations to continue providing sustainable hunting opportunities.  
     Click HERE to learn more about FWC Deer and Wild Turkey Harvest Reporting.

 


Ira Holmes
International Film Series
returns to the Collge of Central Florida

CF Film Seris
The Wild Men film poster

Story and Graphic Provided
By Lisa McGinnes, Manager of Marketing and Public Relations
College of Central Florida
Published July 28, 2022 at 11:12 a.m.
     OCALA —
Films from across the globe that center around themes of humor and perseverance will take center stage in this year’s Ira Holmes International Film Series at the College of Central Florida.

     A full season of in-person film events kicks off Sept. 13.
      “As the late, great Charlie Chaplin proclaimed, ‘A day without laughter is a day wasted,’” said series founder and CF Professor Ira Holmes. “We’re proud to announce that we’re back after two seasons of stream-from-home films, drive-in screenings and virtual film talks. We made it work during a difficult time for our community and our supporters. Now we’re ready to resume seeing movies together in an auditorium with the ability to share our thoughts and feelings. Laughter is therapy, and smiles are also acceptable! In the spirit of the much-loved film classic ‘Singin’ in the Rain,’ we’re ready to ‘make ’em laugh.’”
     This year’s first film will be “Wild Men,” with screenings on Tuesday, Sept. 13, at 2 p.m., at the Appleton Museum, and at 7 p.m., at the CF Ocala Campus. In this 2021 Danish film, Martin sets off into the forest in a misguided attempt to overcome his midlife crisis – armed with only a bow and some animal skins. A chance meeting with a fugitive leads to a twisted trip through the fjords with police, drug runners and his family close behind. Martin’s quest for manhood leads to deep and hilariously uncomfortable realizations about the presumed masculine ideal.


Series Schedule
Sept. 13 – “Wild Men”
Sept. 27 – “The Farewell”
Oct. 11 – “Tony Manero”
Oct. 25 –
Appleton Museum 35th Anniversary Double Feature: “House of Dracula” and “Babette’s Feast”
     The double feature will begin at noon at the Appleton Museum and 5 p.m. at the CF Ocala Campus. Special guest Patricia Tomlinson will introduce “Babette’s Feast” at 6:30 p.m. and will lead a discussion after the evening screening.
Nov. 8 – “Breaking Bread”
Jan. 17 – “Victoria & Abdul”
Jan. 31 – “Parasite”
Feb. 14 – Scary Movie Date Night: “Get Out”
     On Feb. 15 at 12:30 p.m.
, Dr. Gilbert Rodman will lead a “Get Out” Black History Month film talk at the CF Ocala Campus in Building 8, Room 110. The talk also will be live on Zoom.
Feb. 28 – “Neptune Frost”
March 14 – “La Ciénaga”

     All films will be shown Tuesdays at 2 p.m. at the Appleton Museum of Art, 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, and at 7 p.m. at the College of Central Florida, 3001 S.W. College Road, Building 8, Room 110, unless otherwise noted. Films at the Ocala Campus are free and open to the public. Films at the Appleton are free to all museum and film series members; nonmembers pay museum admission. Films may contain mature content.
     For more details, visit https://www.cf.edu/student-life/arts-and-culture/international-film-series/.

 


Regional bay scallop seasons open
Scallops
Information and Graphic Provided
By Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Published June 13, 2022 at 9:12 a.m.
     NORTH FLORIDA --
The 2022 recreational bay scallop season from the Fenholloway River through the Suwannee River opens June 15 and will remain open through Labor Day (Sept. 5).

     This includes all state waters in Dixie County and a portion of Taylor County and includes the towns of Keaton Beach and Steinhatchee.
     The daily bag limit from June 15-30 in this area is 1 gallon of whole bay scallops in the shell or 1 cup shucked bay scallop meat per person, with a maximum of 5 gallons whole or 2 pints (4 cups) shucked bay scallop meat per vessel.
     From July 1 through Labor Day in this area, and for the duration of the open season in other areas, regular bag and vessel limits apply. Regular season limits are 2 gallons of whole bay scallops in the shell or 1 pint of bay scallop meat per person, with a maximum of 10 gallons of whole bay scallops in the shell or 1/2 gallon (4 pints) shucked bay scallop meat per vessel.
     Throughout the season and region-wide, vessel limits do not allow an individual to exceed their personal bag limit.
     Other 2021 season dates of bay scallop season follow:
     ● Franklin County through northwestern Taylor County (including Carrabelle, Lanark and St. Marks): July 1 through Sept. 24. This region includes all state waters from the westernmost point of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County to the mouth of the Fenholloway River in Taylor County.
     ● Levy, Citrus and Hernando counties (including Cedar Key, Crystal River and Homosassa): July 1 through Sept. 24. This region includes all state waters from the mouth of the Suwannee River in Levy County to the Hernando-Pasco county line.
     ● Pasco County: Open for 10 days starting the third Friday in July (July 15-24). This region includes all state waters south of the Hernando-Pasco county line and north of the Anclote Key Lighthouse, including all waters of the Anclote River.
     ● St. Joseph Bay/Gulf County: Aug. 16 through Sept. 24. This region includes all state waters from the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County to the westernmost point of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County.

 


World champions honored
by Levy County Commission

world champs
Avery Emerick (left) and Lillian Hampton-Fortner hold the plaques presented to them on July 19 by the Levy County Board of County Commissioners to recognize them for the world-level of horsemanship in the sport of ranch sorting.

Story and Photos
By Jeff M. Hardison © July 20, 2022 at 9:12 p.m.
     BRONSON –
The four members of the Levy County Board of County Commissioners honored two young women Tuesday (July 19) for the youths’ global level of achievement in an equine-oriented sport.

Michelle Fortner
Michelle Fortner explains the sport of ranch sorting.

Youths honored
The Levy County Commission provides a photo opportunity as its members stand with the world-level of champions. Seen here (from left) are County Commission Vice Chairman John Meeks, County Commissioner Lilly Rooks, Avery Emerick, Lillian Hampton-Fortner, Commissioner Matt Brooks and Commission Chairman Rock Meeks.


     Avery Emerick and Lillian Hampton-Fortner were honored for their achievements in ranch sorting. 
     Emerick was named the 2022 Youth World Champion and Reserve World Champion, as well as being named the Reserve World Champion in the Youth High Point Division at the 2022 Cinch Ranch Sorting World Championship held in Fort Worth, Texas.
     Hampton-Fortner earned the title of 2022 Youth Reserve World Champion and earned seventh place in the Youth High Point Division at the 2022 Cinch Ranch Sorting World Championship held in Fort Worth, Texas.
     Levy County Commissioner Matt Brooks led the program to recognize the outstanding youths.
     Michelle Fortner, upon a request from Commissioner Brooks, spoke to the audience to explain this sport.
     Ranch sorting is when a team of two horse riders have 60 seconds to sort as many cows as possible, Fortner said. That’s how both team members were honored as 2022 Youth Reserve World Champion, while Emerick took the 2022 Youth World Champion title in Ranch Sorting.
     The start/foul line is a 12-foot wide opening between the two pens, with the cattle bunched in the center of the pen on the back wall. There are many finer points in this sport, however Fortner kept the explanation simple for the audience.
     The contest begins when the nose of the first horse crosses the line, and the judge drops the flag. The clock is ticking, and the competitors seek to accomplish their goals within the limits of time.
     These girls competed against teams of other teams of riders from throughout the whole United States, as well as from Spain, France, Australia and Mexico, Fortner said. 
     The girls received certificates of recognition that Tuesday morning in Bronson. These awards are mounted on wood and signed by the four members of the County Commission – Commission Chairman Rock Meeks, Commission Vice Chairman John Meeks, Commissioner Brooks and County Commissioner Lilly Rooks.

In Other Action
     In other action at the July 19 meeting, the County Commission by a 4-0 vote approved County Commissioner Lilly Rooks being able to vote at the later 1:30 p.m. meeting that day, where Jared Blanton, the finance officer in the office of Levy County Clerk Danny Shipp, presented a report about the budget for the current fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30, 2023. Blanton also sought approval of municipal fire agreements with the cities’ fire departments that help the Levy County Fire Rescue (also known as the Levy County Department of Public Safety).
     Levy County Attorney Levy County Attorney Nicolle M. Shalley said that while the previous executive order by the governor to allow voting via teleconference has expired, she believed this vote by Rooks was permissible because she believed Blanton would not be adopting any resolutions or ordinances.
     The Levy County Commission also approved:
     * A 6 percent premium increase on health insurance for employees. The county pays 85 percent of the insurance and the employees who participate pay the other 15 percent of the premium for health insurance.
     * A $100,000 budget increase to the budget due to increased material costs for Levy County Maintenance and Construction in the current fiscal year.
     * A $10,500 increase to the budget due to an emergency repair of the chlorine analyzer for Manatee Springs Utilities, which is the water service provider owned by the county, which serves the Chiefland Golf and Country Club as well as the subdivision in the area.
     * A $100,000 increase to the budget for the continued renovation of the Levy County Government Center, which is where the County Commission conducts meetings, and it is the location in the county seat of Bronson for the Levy County Property Appraiser’s Office, and the Levy County Tax Collector’s Office. There is a dedication ceremony set for Aug. 5 at 9 a.m. to recognize the latest round of improvements to the structure, that was once the Bronson High School.
  
     


CF Webber Gallery invites
artist submissions
for ‘Best Of The Season’ exhibition

Information Provided
By CF Marketing, Public and Community Relations
Published July 9, 2022 at 9:12 a.m.
     OCALA —
For the first time, the Webber Gallery at the College of Central Florida will accept open applications from Central Florida artists for the 2022 “Best of the Season” exhibition.

     From July 8 to Sept. 8, artists are invited to submit their work for consideration. Artists can find the application link at https://www.cf.edu/student-life/arts-and-culture/webber-gallery/.
     The “Best of the Season” exhibition will take place Nov. 7-Dec. 8. Submissions will be juried by judge Ginger Sheridan, who will determine what artwork is accepted into the show and award Best in Show, First Place, Second Place, Third Place, Fourth Place and Honorable Mentions. Awards and prizes will be presented at the opening reception on Nov. 18, 5-7 p.m.
     “Best of the Season” is one of two annual exhibitions sponsored by the Visual Artists’ Society. The VAS has more than 85 members from across Marion County and Central Florida, including professional and amateur artists and many of CF’s talented students. Because VAS has a varied membership, VAS exhibits showcase a variety of styles and mediums, including more traditional paintings and photographs as well as jewelry, sculpture and digital media.
     The Webber Gallery is located at the CF Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. College Road. Hours are 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Thursday and admission is free. For more information, call 352-854-2322, ext. 1664.

 


 

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