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Levy County agrees to endorse
building an oyster reef in bayou
to help counteract erosion
next to Airport Road on island;

County opts out of endorsing
G Street anti-erosion project

Dr. Savannah Barry  HardisonInk.com
Regional Specialized Sea Grant Agent Samantha Barry explains her request for the county to provide a letter of support for two grants.

Story and Photos
By Jeff M. Hardison © July 19, 2018 at 2:08 p.m.
     BRONSON --
Erosion issues in Daughtry Bayou next to Cedar Key are being addressed, Savannah Barry, Ph.D., of the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension told the Levy County Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday (July 17).


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Levy County Commission   HardisonInk.com
County Commission Chairman John Meeks

 

Levy County Commission   HardisonInk.com
County Commission Vice Chairman Mike Joyner

 

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County Commissioner Lilly Rooks

 

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County Commissioner Matt Brooks

 

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County Commissioner Rock Meeks

     Regional Specialized Sea Grant Agent Barry, who works in Cedar Key at the Nature Coast Nature Coast Biological Station, showed commissioners aerial photographs of the Airport Road section to the north of the bayou and G Street to the east of the Bayou from 1961, 1974, 1994 and 2016.
     A significant amount of beach, oyster reef and marsh areas over the past decades have been lost to erosion in that bayou area, she said.  This has caused a loss of recreational value of the shoreline, Dr. Barry added.
     The municipal leaders in the City of Cedar Key approached the scientists at the Nature Coast Nature Coast Biological Station in regard to the two county-owned, county-maintained roads – Airport Road and G Street, she said.
     A plan in 1007 and 2008 to improve the shore next to G Street did not progress, Barry said, due to opposition from homeowners at the time.
     Since 2007, erosion has continued, she said. That has resulted in damage to city infrastructure such as water pipes that are buried under the roads, as well as damage to the roads themselves.
     Airport Road was significantly compromised during Hurricane Hermine, the fourth hurricane of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, she said.
    There have been five meetings since 2016, she said, to address the issues related to erosion in that bayou.
     Dr. Barry has previously presented the Daughtry Bayou Coastal Erosion Wrap-Up Workshop on March 29 at Cedar Key Community Center as one of those meetings. Stakeholders from a broad range of public and private groups, including residential and business property owners, met.
     After a review of possible methods to address erosion there, including hardening of seawalls, rip-rap boulders and beach re-nourishment, she said, the group determined the best method would be to use over the five meetings.
     The scientists are seeking the County Commission to issue a letter of support for grant funding to help the city obtain revenue to implement the two projects.
     Both projects will be giant tidal reef balls, like those used over the past two decades at least, Barry said. They have proved to be successful in helping building oyster reefs. Going inshore from those reefs, salt marsh and beach dunes would build as the reefs became established, Barry said.
     County Commissioner Lilly Rooks said that if this project succeeds in building the oyster reefs and subsequent marsh and beach, then the county would be spending less money than in decades past as it has repaired Airport Road following storm events.
     One grant application is for $384,000 and the other grant request is for $60,000, to start both the Airport Road and the G Street projects respectively, Barry said. Dr. Barry mentioned the Airport Road project is more expensive.
     If these grants are awarded, Barry said, there is zero required match from the city or county, although the University of Florida would need to provide a little bit of money.
     County Commissioner Rooks made a motion for the county to issue a letter supporting the grant application for the Airport Road project, but not for the G Street project, because she did not think there was complete endorsement of that project from the G Street residents.
     County Commissioner Matt Brooks seconded the motion, which met with a 5-0 vote of approval.
     In answering a question from County Commission Vice Chairman Mike Joyner, Barry said that if funding is awarded, this project could begin as early as September of 2019.


Visual Arts and Digital Media
Alumni Show set for Aug. 23

Published July 18, 2018 at 8:08 a.m.
     OCALA --
The College of Central Florida will showcase the talent of its Visual Arts and Digital Media students in an exhibition that opens on Thursday, Aug. 23, at the Webber Gallery, Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. College Road.
     This is the first alumni art exhibition in more than 10 years, titled “PAST2PRESENT” and will showcase a variety of work.   
     “As artists, there is a responsibility to let students that have a passion for art know that the ‘starving artist’ is a myth. With hard work, dedication to your craft, and a support system, they can make it as an artist in the professional world,” said Katelyn Jean, gallery coordinator at the Webber Gallery.  “The idea behind the alumni show is to demonstrate the tenacity of artists and how they made art their career.”
     The public is invited to the opening reception on Thursday, Aug. 23, from 4:30-6:30 p.m.        The exhibit and reception are free. The reception will be combined with the Visual and Performing Arts department’s annual Welcome Back event held at the same time and location.
     The exhibit will continue through Friday, Oct. 5. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The gallery is closed Sundays, Mondays and college-observed holidays. For additional information, call 352-873-5809.



Column and Photo
By Myrtice Scabarozi © July 17, 2018 at 3:08 p.m.
     LEVY COUNTY –
The Log Cabin Quilters met Thursday (July 12) at the Levy County Quilt Museum -- 11050 N.W. 10th Ave. (near Levyville, kind of on the way to Judson on Levy County Road 134 from U.S. Alt. 27).
     Hildreth worked on the quilt in the frame while the other ladies were working on their own projects. At our pot luck lunch, we were interested in tasting the grits pie that was brought in.      The pie looked like an egg custard. It was made with grits, eggs, buttermilk. We topped off our slices with whipped cream made with coconut milk. It was good, although not as good as pecan pie -- even though I did find a recipe for a grits-pecan pie. I’m not ready for that.
     Correctional Officer John and the adult male inmates from Lancaster Correctional Institution were out this week. The rain makes it difficult for the guys to keep up with the weeds. The Blue Sky vine which is a member of the Morning Glory family needs tending every week. Thanks guys for all you do.
     Summertime is a slow time for the Levy County Quilt Museum. We spend the time folding fabric, straighten the shelves. This week we worked on the quilt books. We have hundreds of quilt books/booklets that have been donated. Come out and get ideas for a new quilt.

Log Cabin Quilters via HardisonInk.com
A butterfly table topper is just the thing to brighten your day.

Log Cabin Quilters via HardisonInk.com
Morning coffee with the roosters is just the thing.


Appleton Inspired Speaker
Series features conservationist
and shark buff Jim Abernathy
on Aug. 12 at 2 p.m.

Shark Faces Man  HardisonInk.com
 Jim Abernathy gets up close and personal with a shark during a cage-free dive.

Photo Provided by Appleton Museum of Art

Published July 13, 2018 at 8:08 a.m
     OCALA --
The Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, continues the monthly Inspired Speakers Series with Jim Abernathy on Sunday, Aug. 12, at 2 p.m.

     These monthly presentations feature individuals who not only excel in their fields but are also an inspiration to others.
     Abernathy is an award-winning author, photographer, cinematographer and conservationist who pioneered shark encounters without a cage. Starting at a young age, scuba diving served as an inspiration for his life’s mission as a conservationist. For decades, he has been leading photography/videography expeditions to engage with the world’s largest predatory sharks.
      Abernathy hosts cage-free dive expeditions day and night with tiger, great hammerheads, oceanic white tips, bull, and lemon sharks and he is best known as an extremely passionate crusader for their protection.
     He has received numerous awards for his lifelong dedication as a marine life conservationist. His relentless efforts around conservation have resulted in the creation of two nonprofits WildlifeVOICE and Operation Blue Pride.
     His award-winning marine life images are often featured in the world’s top nature magazines. Additionally, Abernathy’s expedition clients include many of the world’s top nature filmmakers and magazines such as Imax, National Geographic, BBC Wildlife, Animal Planet and Discovery Channel.
     In addition to being a talented photographer, he has authored several books featuring his stunning photographs: Sea Turtles – Up Close, Sharks – Up Close and The Secret of Pig Island. These books will be available for purchase in the Appleton Store, and a book-signing with Abernathy will follow the talk.
      Tickets are free for Appleton members and College of Central Florida students; $10 for nonmembers. Advance reservation or purchase is recommended at AppletonMuseum.org or by calling Griselle Gonzalez at 352-291-4455, ext. 1836.
     Owned and operated by the College of Central Florida, the Appleton Museum of Art is located at 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, east of downtown on State Road 40 (exit 352 east off I-75 or exit 268 west off I-95). Parking is free. For more information, call 352-291-4455 or visit http://appletonmuseum.org/.


Ways to travel
with cremated remains



By Bob Burns, TSA Social Media
Published July 11, 2018 at 8:38 a.m.
     WASHINGTON, D.C. --
You may have seen a story in the news recently about a traveler finding his mother’s cremains spilled in his checked bag at LAX (Los Angeles International Airport).




Photo provided by TSA.

     We understand how painful losing a loved one is, and we express our sincere condolences. It’s terrible that he had to discover this, and we can’t fathom the emotions this would induce.
In an effort to prevent this from happening to anybody else, we’d like to explain what happened and offer some guidance on traveling with cremains.
     We immediately looked into the matter, and upon video review, we learned that the checked bag alarmed for an unidentified object. Upon opening the bag for inspection, a TSA officer discovered that the object was an opened, unmarked ceramic container that was loosely wrapped in aluminum foil. Due to the lack of markings, the officer did not know that the contents were cremains. The container was carefully repacked and the bag was cleared to continue to its destination.
     Travelers are allowed to travel with cremains in a checked bag, however it is recommended to do so in a carry-on bag to help protect the contents from the risks associated with checked baggage. Checked bags are subjected to rapid and sometimes rough movement along a series of conveyor belts as they make the trek to and from the aircraft. A little known fact is that checked bags are only in TSA’s possession for a fraction of their journey to the aircraft.
     TSA has a clear process for screening crematory remains. Our officers routinely conduct these types of screenings throughout our nation’s airports. Crematory remains in carry-on must pass through the X-ray machine to be screened. If the X-ray operator cannot clear the remains, TSA may apply other, non-intrusive means of resolving the alarm. If the officer cannot determine that the container does not contain a prohibited item, the remains will not be permitted.
     We understand the emotional stress passengers may be under when transporting the remains of a loved one. Our guidelines for traveling with crematory remains are not intended to make this already emotionally difficult process more complex than needed. However, crematory remains are one of the many sensitive items that could be exploited by someone wanting to conceal a dangerous item. TSA officers are trained to treat all travelers’ belongings with care and respect and will not open containers with cremated remains, even if the passenger requests this be done.
     We have a team of TSA employees who are ready to answer your questions via Twitter at @AskTSA or via Facebook Messenger. They look forward to answering your questions 365 days a year from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time daily. You may also reach our contact center by email or by phone at 866-289-9673. Federal Relay: 711
     Some airlines do not allow crematory remains in checked baggage, so check with your airline first.


Appleton Inspired Speaker
Series features guitar greats
Howard Paul and
Robert Benedetto on July 29


Howard Paul (left) and Robert Benedetto (right) with Pat Martino.
Story and Photos Provided
Published July 4, 2018 at 5:18 p.m.

 
     OCALA — The Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, continues the monthly Inspired Speakers Series with Howard Paul and Robert Benedetto on July 29 at 2 p.m.




1991 Desert Storm, Saudi Arabia, Howard Paul (right) is promoted to captain and is seen here with Brig. Gen. Gary Whaley.

     These monthly presentations feature individuals who not only excel in their fields, but also are an inspiration to others. 
     From jazz guitarist to Army officer to corporate executive, Howard Paul is a man of many talents.
     A gifted musician and business leader, for years he has maintained dual careers in music and business. In 2006, he was named president/CEO of Benedetto Guitars in Savannah, Ga. — a position he inherited from Robert Benedetto and still holds today.
     Paul will discuss and demonstrate how guitars create sound, how the ear perceives those sounds, and how the innovative construction of Benedetto guitars creates specific tones and resonance. After the talk, Paul will be joined onstage by Robert Benedetto for a question-and-answer session.
     Robert Benedetto is world-renowned and widely acknowledged as today’s foremost maker of archtop guitars, whose sound is particularly popular with jazz, blues, rockabilly and psychobilly guitarists.
     Over a prolific 47-year career, he has personally handcrafted nearly 1,000 instruments, including 500 archtops.
     Paul notes that, “Bob’s unparalleled career has impacted the entire industry, and raised the bar for luthiers, manufacturers and players alike. His 47 years of experience, experimentation and collaboration with the greatest players of their day, and willingness to share his secrets and know-how can be heard and felt in every Benedetto guitar made today, as they reflect Benedetto’s character and talent.”
     Don’t miss this unique opportunity to learn more about guitars and acoustics from two incredibly passionate and knowledgeable people in the music industry. 
     Tickets are free for Appleton members and College of Central Florida students; $10 for nonmembers. Advance reservation or purchase is recommended at AppletonMuseum.org or by calling Griselle Gonzalez at 352-291-4455, ext. 1836.
     Owned and operated by the College of Central Florida, the Appleton Museum of Art is located at 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, east of downtown on SR 40 (exit 352 east off I-75 or exit 268 west off I-95). Parking is free. For more information, call 352-291-4455 or visit http://appletonmuseum.org/.

 

 


 

FWC offers hunter safety
Internet-completion courses
offered in August

FWC photo published in HardisonInk.com
Photo Provided By FWC

Published July 3, 2018 at 8:48 a.m.
     LAKE CITY --
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering free hunter safety Internet-completion courses in eight counties during August (listed below).
Students who have taken the online course and wish to complete the classroom portion must bring the online-completion report with them.
     All firearms, ammunition and materials are provided free of charge. Students should bring a pen or pencil and paper. An adult must accompany children younger than 16 at all times.
     Anyone born on or after June 1, 1975, must pass an approved hunter safety course and have a hunting license to hunt alone (unsupervised). The FWC course satisfies hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces.
     The counties, dates and times are:
Alachua County
Aug. 4 (8 a.m. until complete)
Gainesville
~
Aug. 18 (8 a.m. until complete)
Gainesville
~
Baker County
Aug. 25 (8 a.m. until noon) Macclenny and (1 p.m. until complete) Lake City
~                                                   
Clay County
Aug. 9 (6 to 9 p.m.) Orange Park and Aug. 11 (8 a.m. until complete) Graham
~
Aug. 23 (6 to 9 p.m.) Keystone Heights and Aug. 25 (8 a.m. until complete) Graham
~
Columbia County
Aug. 25 (8 a.m. until complete)
Lake City
~
Duval County
Aug. 23 (6 to 9 p.m.) and Aug. 25 (8:30 a.m. until noon)
Jacksonville
~
Lafayette County
Aug. 18 (8 a.m. until complete) Mayo
~
Levy County
Aug. 12 (2 p.m. until complete) Chiefland
~
Aug. 26 (3 to 7 p.m.) Williston

~
Madison County
Aug. 18 (noon until complete) Madison
~
     The specific locations for these classes will be given to those who register in advance. Those interested in attending a course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at http://myfwc.com/HunterSafety or by calling the FWC’s Regional Office in Lake City at 386-758-0525.


Bay scallop season opened
July 1 in Franklin,
Northwest Taylor and
Levy, Citrus and Hernando


Scallop Dates
This map shows some scallop season facts.

By Amanda Nalley of the FWC
Published June 30, 2018 at 8:08 a.m.
Updated July 13, 2018 at 68:08 a.m.
     NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA --
Starting July 1, state waters off the following areas will open to bay scallop harvest: Franklin through northwest Taylor County (including Carrabelle, Lanark and St. Marks) and Levy, Citrus and Hernando counties (including Cedar Key, Crystal River and Homosassa).




FWC Photo of scallops underwater


     These areas will remain open to harvest through Sept. 24.
     “Scalloping is a great way to enjoy Florida’s incredible waters and pristine beaches," Gov. Rick Scott said. "I encourage all Floridians to get outside and enjoy our world-class scallop season with family and friends.”
     "Scalloping with your friends and family is classic Florida fun in the sun," said Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Chairman Bo Rivard. "The season brings people and an economic boost to these coastal areas, all the while encouraging conservation and connecting residents and visitors to the wonders of Florida's outdoors."
* Bag limits and other regulations
     Bag and vessel limits in open bay scallop harvest zones are 2 gallons whole bay scallops in shell or 1 pint of bay scallop meat per person, with a maximum of 10 gallons of whole bay scallops in shell or 1/2 gallon of bay scallop meat per vessel.
     Scallops may be collected by hand or with a landing or dip net.
     Scallops must be landed within areas that are open to harvest and may not be possessed on waters outside of areas that are open to harvest or during the closed season.
     There is no commercial harvest allowed for bay scallops in Florida.
     For information on bay scallop regulations, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on “Saltwater Fishing,” “Recreational Regulations” and “Bay Scallops.”

Boater and scalloper safety
     Be safe when diving for scallops. Stay within 300 feet of a properly displayed divers-down flag or device when scalloping in open water, and within 100 feet of a properly displayed divers-down flag or device if on a river, inlet or navigation channel. Boat operators traveling within 300 feet of a divers-down flag or device in open water or within 100 feet of one on a river, inlet or navigational channel must slow to idle speed. For more information, visit MyFWC.com/Boating/Regulations and click on “Divers-down Warning Devices.” Always remember to properly stow divers-down devices when divers and snorkelers have exited the water.
Other best practices
     Snorkel with a buddy.
     Always have an observer on board the boat while others are scalloping.
     Do not discard scallop shells in inshore waters commonly used for recreational activities such as the Homosassa River or Crystal River. Piles of discarded scallop shells can create hazards for swimmers and damage seagrass habitat. Scallop shells can be discarded in a trash receptacle or in larger bodies of water where they are more likely to disperse.
     Be aware of changing tides.
     Stash your trash.
     Wear your personal flotation device when the boat is underway.

2018  Season Dates and Boundaries
     St. Joseph Bay and Gulf County: Aug. 17 – Sept. 30. This region includes all state waters from the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County to the westernmost point of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County.
     Franklin through northwest Taylor County (including Carrabelle, Lanark and St. Marks): July 1 – Sept. 24. This region includes all state waters from the westernmost point of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County to Rock Island near the mouth of the Fenholloway River in Taylor County.
     The remaining portion of Taylor County and all of Dixie County (including Keaton Beach and the Steinhatchee area): June 16 – Sept. 10. This region includes all state waters east of Rock Island near the mouth of the Fenholloway River in Taylor County and north of Alligator Pass Daybeacon #4 near the mouth of the Suwannee River in Levy County.
     Levy, Citrus and Hernando counties (including Cedar Key, Crystal River and Homosassa): July 1 – Sept. 24. This region includes all state waters south of Alligator Pass Daybeacon #4 near the mouth of the Suwannee River in Levy County to the Hernando – Pasco county line.
     Pasco County: A trial 10-day open season will occur July 20-29. This region includes all state waters south of the Hernando – Pasco county line and north of the Anclote Key Lighthouse in northern Pinellas County, and includes all waters of the Anclote River.

--UPDATED--
SATURDAY  JULY 21  11:48 a.m.
Levy, Dixie and Gilchrist counties







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