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TUESDAY  SEPT. 21  7:11 a.m.  Levy, Dixie and Gilchrist counties


French Art Nouveau
exhibition set for Nov. 6-Jan. 9

Appleton Museum of Art  HardisonInk.com
Alphonse Mucha, “Zodiaque,” 1896, Color lithograph on paper mounted on linen.

Story and Photos Provided
By Marketing, Public and Community Relations
Published Sept. 20, 2021 at 10:11 a.m.
     OCALA --
The Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, announces “Alphonse Mucha: Master of Art Nouveau,” on view from Nov. 6 through Jan. 9, 2022.
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Appleton Museum of Art  HardisonInk.com
Alphonse Mucha, “Reverie, Variant 4,” 1898, Color lithograph on paper mounted on linen.

Appleton Museum of Art  HardisonInk.com
Angelina Lippert, chief curator of Poster House in New York City.


     Selected from the The Dhawan Collection, Los Angeles, one of the finest private collections of Mucha’s work in the United States, the exhibition presents 75 works by Mucha, who is most often remembered for the prominent role he played in shaping the aesthetics of French Art Nouveau at the turn of the 20th century.
     Included in the exhibition are rare original lithographs and proofs, an oil painting, drawings, a pastel, and books, posters, portfolios and ephemera. The exhibition is curated by esteemed art historian Gabriel Weisberg, professor of Art History, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, who has provided an essay for the exhibition catalog. Weisberg writes, “In 1900, when the widely distributed French periodical Art et Décoration published a long and exhaustive article on the work of Alphonse Mucha (1860–1939), the Czechoslovakian artist was at the pinnacle of his creative powers.
     Varied, expressive, and seductive, his works were given the name “the Mucha style.” Later the style was identified as “Art Nouveau.”
     Mucha’s successes in many fields of creativity are revealed in the exhibition, dedicated to the broad range of his work. The exhibition focuses on posters, book and journal illustrations, the Slav Epic canvases, and the ways Mucha revitalized an interest in these media.  It provides an opportunity to see how the different media, clients and objectives reflect the time period in which the artist lived and worked.
      “Mucha’s ability to understand the major creative themes of the day, to use them in the most original ways possible, and to create works of art that remain seductive for future generations, is truly his great triumph,” Weisberg said.
     With objects drawn from the extensive Dhawan Collection, and with the publication of this catalog, the exhibition provides a new, original way of seeing one of the most prolific creators of fin-de-siècle imagery.
     The exhibition and museum tour were organized by Landau Traveling Exhibitions, of Los Angeles, California.


Upcoming Exhibition Events

Director’s Circle and VIP Opening Reception -- Friday, Nov. 5, 6-8 p.m.
     Appleton Director’s Circle members are invited for a reception and to be the first to see “Alphonse Mucha: Master of Art Nouveau.” Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be served. RSVP required to Colleen Harper, harperc@cf.edu, or 352-291-4455, ext. 1831.

Online Exhibition Talk with Angelina Lippert
“The Art Nouveau Posters of Alphonse Mucha” -- Sunday, Dec. 12, 2 p.m.

     Learn more about Alphonse Mucha and his iconic posters in this free online talk by Angelina Lippert, chief curator of Poster House in New York City. Poster House is the first museum in the United States dedicated exclusively to posters. There is no fee or registration required to attend.
Meeting ID: 939 8382 6915
Passcode: 011181


     The Appleton Museum, Artspace and Store are open Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, from noon to 5 p.m.
     A campus of the College of Central Florida, the Appleton Museum of Art is located at 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, east of downtown on SR 40 (exit 352 east off I-75 or exit 268 west off I-95).
     Parking is free. For more information, call 352-291-4455 or visit https://www.appletonmuseum.org/.


Indians beat Bears
Chiefland Beats Dixie County at varsity football 2021
Chiefland running back Paul Harris takes the handoff from quarterback Donovan Minicello and runs through a gap in the Dixie County defensive line.

Story and Photos
By Terry Witt, HardisonInk Correspondent
© Sept. 18, 2021 at 11:11 a.m.
     CHIEFLAND --
The Chiefland Middle High School Indians defeated the Dixie County Middle School Bears 14-7 Friday in a varsity football game where sheer grit, athleticism, toughness and turnovers were all factors.

 

 

 

 

Chiefland Beats Dixie County at varsity football 2021
Chiefland runner Clint Thomas carries the football as he follows his lead blocker Dakota Fisher, while they look for running room.

Chiefland Beats Dixie County at varsity football 2021
Chiefland defender D.J. Moore sacks Dixie County quarterback Bret Nettles for a loss in the first half.

Chiefland Beats Dixie County at varsity football 2021
Indian power runner Jamie Strong (# 7 at left with the football) takes aim at the Bears’ defense as he prepares to run for big yardage.

Chiefland Beats Dixie County at varsity football 2021
Dixie quarterback Bret Nettles hands off to running back Kolton Hunt for a big gain in yardage.

Chiefland Beats Dixie County at varsity football 2021
Dixie county fullback Bryar Mitchell plunges into the left side of the Chiefland defense for good yardage.

Chiefland Beats Dixie County at varsity football 2021
Dixie County quarterback Bret Nettles fires a completed pass over the Chiefland defense under heavy pressure. The flying pigskin is in the upper left corner of this picture.


     Chiefland Head Varsity Football Coach Adam Gore told his team there wasn’t a tougher team on the field than the Indians and he was extremely proud of their four quarters of great effort.
     “We knew it was going to be a slugfest. At the end of the day, we played well enough to win the football game,” Gore said.
     Chiefland, 4-0, is taking next Friday night off from varsity football, per the schedule for this season. Dixie, 2-2, is slated to travel to Jasper, where the Bears are set to face the Hamilton County High School Trojans next week.
     Dixie County Head Varsity Football Coach L.B. Cravey said the Chiefland and Dixie County teams are similar in the way they play football, but he said Dixie County lost the game on turnovers. Chiefland won the turnover battle.
     “We got to hold onto the ball. We lost too many balls on turnovers,” Cravey said.
     Coach Cravey said he felt he had the better conditioned team. They fought as hard as Chiefland, but in the end, they weren’t able to hold on to the ball at critical moments, the visiting team’s coach said immediately after the game Friday night in Chiefland.
     “That’s something that can’t happen in a game like this,” Cravey said.
     Chiefland and Dixie County played to a draw in the first quarter. No points were scored. Turnovers were a factor for both teams then.
     At the start of the second quarter, the Dixie County Bears fumbled and the Chiefland Indians recovered at their own 40. The Indians scored on a 60-yard pass to Clint Thomas. The extra point was good.
     The second Chiefland touchdown was the result of another Dixie County fumble that the Indians recovered at their own 41. Chiefland’s Jamie Strong broke loose for a 60-yard touchdown run. The extra point was good, giving Chiefland a 14-0 lead with 6:38 left in the half. Chiefland took a 14-0 lead into halftime.
     In the third quarter, the Bears mounted their most consistent offensive effort, driving from their own 35 to score on an 8-yard touchdown pass to Brendan Hall. The extra point was good.    
     The Bears continued to turn over the ball. Late in the fourth quarter, Chiefland’s Dakota Fisher intercepted a Dixie County pass at the Dixie County 17. Chiefland drove to the one-foot line before a Chiefland fumble gave Dixie County possession.
     Dixie County mounted its final drive of the night with 1:19 left in the game, but ran out of time before they could cross midfield.

 


CF Citrus campus to display
poetry-inspired art Oct. 4 through Dec. 3

Poetry becomes art
Crow Gone Rogue by Brenda Spilios, leader of the art group artOasis.

Story and Photo Provided
By CF Marketing, Public and Community Relations
Published Sept. 14, 2021 at 3:11 p.m.
    LECANTO —
The College of Central Florida will exhibit the work of six local artists inspired by the haiku-inspired poems of Wallace Stevens. 

     “Blackbird Bound: Visual Verses” will be on display from Oct. 4 through Dec. 3 at the Citrus Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway.
     Through paintings and sculptures, the artists have reimagined Steven’s “13 Ways of Looking at a Blackbird,” which explores different ways of seeing and perceiving the world. This delightful exhibit displays selected artworks alongside Stevens’ poems, pairing art with literature. Visual sensations in the poems and artworks include winter landscapes, geometry, and fairy tales. All play with point of view and perception.
     There is no fee to view the exhibit, which is on display in the upper level of the Dorothea Jerome Building. Viewing hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
     The exhibit will be closed during the weekend. For more information contact Michele Wirt, Visual Arts and Humanities faculty, at 352-746-6721, ext. 6131, or email wirtm@cf.edu

 


Appleton Museum of Art
to open new show
‘Heart Of The Horse:
Photographs by Juliet van Otteren’

Oct. 9, 2021-April 24, 2022

Appleton Museum of Art horse photo
Contemplation 1/19,’ 2003, Silver gelatin print, 16 x 20 in.

Story and Art Provided
By CF Marketing, Public and Community Relations
Published Sept. 1, 2021 at 10:11 a.m.
     OCALA --
The Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, announces “Heart of the Horse: Photographs by Juliet van Otteren,” on view Oct. 9, 2021-April 24, 2022.
     The 40 black and white photographs of horses reflect the beauty and complexity of these exquisite animals.Appleton Museum of Art horse photo

 

 



‘Defying Gravity,’ 2003, Silver gelatin print, 16 x 20 in.

 



     Internationally acclaimed photographer Juliet van Otteren’s photographs seek more than the simple documentation of beautiful horses. Rather, her black and white images strive to capture their essence, perhaps even a glimpse into their souls. By spending significant time with a limited number of equine subjects, van Otteren is able to forge an intimate connection that captures their grace, close familial relationships, playfulness, and their ancient bond with us as human beings.
     Juliet van Otteren began creating photographs when she lived in various communities in the Himalayas and the Middle East. After living in the serenity of the English countryside for many years, van Otteren returned to the United States in the late 1990s and is now based in Florida.
     Her work is in the collections of the National Portrait Gallery in London, the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C., and the Bibliothèque Nationale de France in Paris, among many others. Private collections include those of Gloria Vanderbilt, William Kennedy, Isabel Allende and Stephen Hawking.
     Today, van Otteren continues to travel the world creating unique images. The accompanying catalog, “Heart of the Horse,” with texts by astrophysicist and author Alan Lightman and a foreword by renowned primatologist Jane Goodall, was published by Barnes & Noble in 2004. The book will be available for purchase in the Appleton Store.


Upcoming Events with the Artist

Gallery Tours
Saturday, Nov. 6, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.

     Visit the museum on Free First Saturday and take a tour of “Heart of the Horse” with van Otteren. Both tour times are free for members and nonmembers as part of Free First Saturday. No registration required to attend.

Artist’s Outlook Online Talk
Thursday, Nov. 18, 7 p.m.

     Join Curator of Exhibitions Patricia Tomlinson and van Otteren for a free talk on Zoom to discuss the artist’s work, inspirations, and more.
Meeting ID: 302 190 0088 │Passcode: 352352

     The Appleton Museum, Artspace and Store are open Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. A campus of the College of Central Florida, the Appleton Museum of Art is located at 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, east of downtown on SR 40 (exit 352 east off I-75 or exit 268 west off I-95). Parking is free. For more information, call 352-291-4455 or visit https://www.appletonmuseum.org/.

 


Bears defeat Red Devils 49-10
Dixie County Versus Williston in Varsity Football 2021 HardisonInk.com
A pass intended for Williston's Iharez Williams is knocked down by Dixie County's Luke Thomas (#10) and one other defender. The players were close to the Dixie County end zone.

Story and Photos
By Terry Witt, HardisonInk Correspondent
© Sept. 11, 2021 at 10:11 a.m.
     WILLISTON --
The Dixie County Middle High School Bears defeated the Williston Middle High School Red Devils Friday night 49-10 in a cross-county varsity football rivalry that took place under the lights at the Red Devils’ Booster Stadium.


Dixie County Versus Williston in Varsity Football 2021 HardisonInk.com
Dixie County's Kolton Hunt (#8) veers around left end to score a touchdown for the Bears.

Dixie County Versus Williston in Varsity Football 2021 HardisonInk.com
Ajavien Anderson (right), a 260-pound Williston fullback playing as a tailback due to team injuries, rumbles toward Dixie County's Luke Thomas. The two collided with force.

Dixie County Versus Williston in Varsity Football 2021 HardisonInk.com
Williston quarterback Edariyon Wesley slams on the brakes as he makes a cut to avoid being tackled.

Dixie County Versus Williston in Varsity Football 2021 HardisonInk.com
Dixie County's Makyll Walker sprints around right end for a touchdown.

Dixie County Versus Williston in Varsity Football 2021 HardisonInk.com
Dixie County's Carson St. Laurent turns the corner for a big gain as the Williston defense pursues.

Dixie County Versus Williston in Varsity Football 2021 HardisonInk.com
Williston receiver Iharez Williams (#3) receives a pass and looks for running space downfield.


     While the outcome of the game was never in doubt after the first quarter, Dixie County and Williston varsity football players never stopped battling on the field, and both coaches expressed pride in the effort of their respective teams.
     “I was proud of our boys,” Dixie County Head Varsity Football Coach L.B. Cravey said. “Williston’s always been a big rivalry for Dixie County. We came out and played hard. We tried to play our best game and tried to execute it.
     “We made some mistakes here and there,” Coach Cravey continued. “We need to clean up some things. We got a big game next week at Chiefland. But I was overall pleased with the boys. We came in to win, and we got it done.”
      Dixie County is 2-1 overall so far in the regular season, with the Bears’ win over the Williston Red Devils. Williston is 0-3 and is headed to Jasper next Friday to take on the Hamilton County Middle High School Trojans Varsity Football Team.
Williston first year Head Varsity Football Coach Greg Harper said he saw improvement in his young team, which has five seniors and a lot of sophomores.
     “I don’t think they ever gave up tonight,” Coach Harper said. “It’s a testament to the fact that they continue to get better. It’s a shame we can’t make it show on the scoreboard. The scoreboard at halftime looked ugly but we gave them 21 of those points off turnovers.
     “I felt in the first half, other than a couple of plays on defense, they played pretty well,” Coach Harper continued. “Again, I saw improvement. That’s what we’re trying to get every week. We’re just trying to get better and the scoreboard will take care of itself. But we’re still not good enough yet.”

Scoring Summary
     Williston got off to a slow start when it fumbled the ball on its first possession and Dixie County recovered. The Bears’ Kolton Hunt ran 23 yards for a touchdown. The extra point was good.
     The Red Devils responded by marching from their own 45-yard line to score on a 30-yard field goal by Eddie De La Cruz.
     Dixie County scored a touchdown on its next possession when Hunt ran for a 43-yard score. Carson St. Laurent kicked the extra point to give Dixie County a 14-3 lead with 4:17 left in the first quarter.
     Hunt intercepted a Williston pass on the next Red Devils’ possession. The Bears marched downfield to score on 22-yard run by Carson St. Laurent. The extra point by St. Laurent was good.
     Williston gave up possession of the ball on its next set of downs when a high snap sailed over the head of the punter. Dixie County recovered on the Williston 14.
     The Bears were unable to take advantage of the turnover at first, but Dixie County got the ball back on a fumble recovery. The Bears Makyll Walker scored from a yard out and the extra point was good.
     The Red Devils offense continued to make costly mistakes. Dixie County’s St. Laurent intercepted a Williston pass and returned it 55 yards for a touchdown. The extra point was good.
     Williston scored on a 30-yard pass from Edariyon Wesley to Iharez Williams with 6:48 left in the third quarter. De Le Cruz added the extra point to make it 35-10.
     Dixie County added another touchdown when it drove from its own 40 to score on a 6-yard touchdown by Hunt. The extra point by St. Laurent was good.
     The Bears’ final touchdown came on a 15-yard run by St. Laurent with 58 seconds left in the third quarter. The extra point was good, wrapping up the game’s scoring with the 49-10 win by the Bears over the Red Devils.

 


Levy County 4-H open enrollment begins
Levy County 4-H
Information Provided
By Jessica Emerson Campos
Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
UF/IFAS Extension Levy County
Published Aug. 31, 2021 at 10:11 a.m.
     BRONSON --
Enrollment for the 2021-2022 4-H Year is open.
     Levy County 4-H consists of nine in-school and community clubs that are located throughout Levy County. With this many options, there are club meetings that are close to everyone.
     4-H is delivered by Cooperative Extension—a community of more than 100 public universities across the nation that provide experiences where young people learn by doing. For more than 100 years, 4-H has welcomed young people of all beliefs and backgrounds, giving kids a voice to express who they are and how they make their lives and communities better.
     Through life-changing 4-H programs, nearly six million children and teens have taken on critical societal issues, such as addressing community health inequities, engaging in civil discourse and advocating for equity and inclusion for all.
     In 4-H, there is a shared belief in the power of young people.
     This organization sees that every child has valuable strengths and has influence to improve the world.
     Membership age of youth participation is determined by the individual’s age as of Sept. 1 of the current program year.
     People who are between 5 and 18 years old may enroll in 4-H. Children who between 5 and 7 years old are classified as Cloverbud members. The Cloverbud years are designed to explore all that 4-H has to offer and to discover what the members’ project interests may be. Members from 8 to 18 years old can choose from many different project areas. The possibilities are unlimited.
     4-H is an all-inclusive youth organization that offers a variety of youth involvement, ranging from school-based programs to community clubs. Youth are encouraged to join 4-H and find their passion by exploring the many opportunities the program has to offer. Enrollment is now open for the 2021-2022 year through the 4HOnline web portal – https://v2.4honline.com/
     For more information about the Levy County 4-H Program, please call the UF/IFAS Extension Office in Bronson at 352-486-5131 and ask for 4-H Agent Jessica Emerson, or Curneisha Myers, 4-H program assistant.

 


Appleton Museum of art offers art classes
and workshops for children and adults

Art classes at the Appleton Museum in Ocala
Children from 7 through 12 years old can enroll in the multiweek Art Explorations program that focuses on drawing and painting.

Story and Photos Provided
By CF Marketing, Public and Community Relations
Published Aug. 21, 2021 at 4:11 p.m.
Updated Sept. 20, 2021 at 11:11 a.m.
     OCALA —
The Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, announces its fall 2021 schedule of art classes and workshops for children and adults. From one-day workshops to multi-week classes, with online and in-person options, there’s something for everyone.


Art classes at the Appleton Museum in Ocala
Sue Primeau will lead a one-day watercolor workshop at the Appleton, as well as a multi-week class for more advanced students.


     For adults, the Art 101 workshop series returns with online, two-hour Zoom sessions on Oct. 12 and Nov. 9. Online workshops are free; supply lists are provided in advance. On Oct. 23, watercolorist Sue Primeau will lead a special, in-person Art 101 workshop at the Appleton. The award-winning painter will also teach a multi-week, in-person master class for more advanced watercolor artists. There is a fee for in-person workshops; visit AppletonMuseum.org for more information.
     For adults and teens, the Appleton Book Club continues meeting monthly on Zoom, September through November. Read at your own pace, then join in for a group discussion on Zoom. Upcoming books include “The Hare with Amber Eyes,” by Edmund De Waal (meeting Sept. 14); “Women in Art: 50 Fearless Creatives Who Inspired the World,” by Rachel Ignotofsky (meeting Oct. 12); and “The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World,” by Virginia Postrel (meeting Nov. 9). Book Club meetings are free; advance registration required via Eventbrite.
     Fall classes for children are being offered in person. Ages 7-12 can enroll in six-week Art Explorations classes, scheduled for Saturdays. The two Drawing and Painting sessions each feature different projects — enroll in one, or both. All materials are included in the registration fee. For Pre-K students, the popular and free Museum & Me program resumes with classes on the first Tuesday of each month, September through December.
     In collaboration with Hospice of Marion County, the Appleton is offering a special program for children and families. Ages 7-12 and accompanying adults are invited to create artwork to commemorate difficulties faced during the pandemic or through the loss of a loved one. Two dates are being offered, Sept. 25 and Oct. 9, each with a different curriculum. Workshops are free, and participants may enroll in one or both dates.
     Advance registration via Eventbrite is required for all classes and workshops. Visit AppletonMuseum.org for class descriptions, prices and registration links.
     The Appleton Museum, Artspace and Store are open Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. A campus of the College of Central Florida, the Appleton Museum of Art is located at 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, east of downtown on SR 40 (exit 352 east off I-75 or exit 268 west off I-95). Parking is free. For more information, call 352-291-4455 or visit AppletonMuseum.org.

 


FWC offers tips to help sea turtles survive
baby sea turtles in Florida
Baby seat turtles having emerged from their eggs leave their nest in the beach sand.

Story and Photos Provided
By Michelle Kerr and Carli Segelson
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Published Aug. 20, 2021 at 7:11 a.m.

     TALLAHASSEE --
Sea turtles lay eggs in nests on Florida beaches beginning in the spring and throughout the summer, and now the baby turtles are hatching!
     The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) asks the public to help these tiny turtles stay safe with the following tips.
     During sea turtle nesting season (March 1-Oct. 31), it is important to keep your distance from sea turtles and their nests on the beach. Sea turtles are protected, so you should allow hatchlings to crawl toward the ocean on their own. Any interference or disturbance, including getting too close, can cause hatchlings to become confused and lose their way. The trek to the water from the nest is part of the process that helps them orient themselves to their surroundings and for females to remember their home beach.
     Bright lights from buildings, cellphones or cameras can cause them to become disoriented, leading the hatchlings to stray away from the shoreline where they need to swim and start their life. If they are unable to reach the ocean quickly, they can become dehydrated and exhausted, making them an easy meal for predators.
      “Interfering with a sea turtle hatchling’s trek to the ocean can have fatal consequences,” said FWC sea turtle biologist Dr. Robbin Trindell. “It’s very important to leave them undisturbed. By keeping beaches dark, beachfront buildings dark and giving sea turtles space, we can make sure that our children and grandchildren can also enjoy watching them make this amazing journey.”
     Did you know you can make a difference for Florida’s sea turtles? Follow these tips and share them with your community:
     ● Keep beaches dark. After sundown, turn off any lights not necessary for human safety. Use long wavelength amber LED lamps for lights that must stay lit and shield lights, so they are not visible from the beach. Remember to close shades or curtains at night.
     ● No flash photos. On the beach at night, don’t take flash photos or use bright cellphones or flashlights. This can cause turtles to become disoriented and crawl away from the ocean, putting them at risk.
     ● Remember, sea turtles are protected by law. Keep your distance and give sea turtles space if you see one on the beach. Never touch a nesting turtle because it might leave the beach without nesting if disturbed.
     ● Clear the way at the end of the day. Beach furniture, boats, toys and trash left behind on the sand can become obstacles that block crawling sea turtles. Fill in any holes dug in the sand. Holes can trap turtles and they also pose a safety risk to humans.
     Please report sea turtles that are sick, injured, dead, entangled or are in danger to the FWC’s Wildlife Alert Hotline: 888-404-3922 so trained responders can help.

 



Log Cabin Quilters in HardisonInk.com
Column and Photo
By Myrtice Scabarozi
Published Sept. 30, 2021 at 11:11 a.m.
   LEVY COUNTY --
We’ve had a good week at the Levy County Quilt Museum.
     Cheryl Zink from St. Petersburg sent us two quilts that were made by church ladies in Worthington, Indiana, for her grandmother Zona Carson. These two quilts were made after their home was destroyed by a fire. We are happy to have these quilts and to know something of their history.
     We plan to get them up on display after our adult male inmates from Lancaster Correctional Institution return to perform some chores for us. The inmates at LCI have helped the museum for many decades; however, the health problems caused by the global COVID-19 pandemic have caused the Florida Department of Corrections to amend some of its practices that are pre-pandemic.
     I wish we could do ladders, but we’re safer on the ground. Thanks, Cheryl for sharing your family quilts with us.
    On Wednesday (Sept. 15) several bags of fabric and books were brought in. I’m happy to report the books and magazines are out on shelves and ready to go to their new home. Thanks, everyone for thinking of us.
     We’ve been getting in several local and out-of-area first-time visitors. We are so very glad you found us. Some of our visitors will be back, bringing friends to see our Sieglinde Shoen Smith collection of quilts. It is quite an impressive collection.
     Tuesdays at the Levy County Quilt Museum usually are spent measuring fabric and trying to get the fabric organized, which means we’ve managed to find a lot of scraps we’ve set aside to deal with later. Later has arrived. So, now we have several bags of scraps for someone looking for scraps.
     The Levy County Quilt Museum is located at 11050 N.W. 10th Ave., Chiefland. The phone number is 352-493-2801. It is open from Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Log Cabin Quilters HardisonInk.com
Purple Dawn is a queen-sized quilt that might come in handy in a few months.

Log Cabin Quilters HardisonInk.com
One of the quilts made by the church ladies for Zona Carson in the 1940s. It's a little worn but it's over 70 years old. Some 70-year-old things tend to look a little worn.

 


 

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