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Tammy Boyle announces
intent to seek election
to Levy County School Board

Published June 29, 2020 at 9:10 a.m.
     PUBLISHER’S NOTE:
Some candidates have already placed their announcements on HardisonInk.com. This is a free service open to all candidates, once. Following is the announcement sent by Tammy Boyle, who is seeking to be elected to the Levy County School Board seat (District 2) being vacated by Chris Cowart, as he seeks to be elected as superintendent of schools in Levy County.
Levy County School Board Candidate Tammy Boyle HardisonInk.com
Hello Citizens of Levy County,
     There was such an outpouring of dedication toward the common goal of finalizing this school year, and the overall well-being of our children; from Chiefland to Cedar Key, Williston to Bronson to Yankeetown, and everywhere in between, the efforts and results of our Levy County schools have been extraordinary. All our selfless school employees have worked tirelessly in their efforts with distance learning, calls, emails, delivering meals and so much more. An entire organization has plunged ahead despite this unprecedented and unforeseen scenario.
     Our community is beyond impressive and I am even more inspired to continue my efforts in gaining your support to serve on our Levy County School Board in the District 2 seat. Fortunately, even while maintaining social distancing, I have had the opportunity to speak with many community and school members since filing my candidacy in February. From now until Election Day Aug. 18, 2020, I look forward to meeting and conveying my vision to many more.
     Throughout the last 30 years, I have held various managerial positions in large Dental Practices, Departments of Financial Institutions and currently manage our family Mobile Diagnostic Ultrasound company. During the past 13 years, I have continuously served multiple Levy County schools as a parent volunteer in and out of the classroom, as a member on our schools SAC (Student Advisory Committee) and DAC (District Advisory Committee), along with helping our athletic programs.
     My mission statement to all is this: I'm a candidate with an open mind, the willingness to listen, and a passion for all students to graduate prepared for a successful future. My dedication is never-ending, and I ask you to consider supporting me as we move in a direction to improve our student's education while maintaining traditional values of hard work, integrity, discipline, self-reliance and personal responsibility.
Thank you,
Tammy Boyle
     Please feel free to contact me anytime with your questions or concerns via email (tmbschools@gmail.com) or call 352-262-7450.

 


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Chiefland celebrates Juneteenth;
Civic leaders urge
peaceful process for equal justice

Juneteenth 2020 in Chiefland  HardisonInk.com
Before the walk from Buie Park to City Hall, Daphina Williams dons a mask, demonstrating her awareness about COVID-19 and her care for human lives. Williams is a licensed funeral director in Gainesville, who is a member of the Williston High School’s Graduating Class of 1989. She is also a member of the Miami-based Don't Take My Life. Let Me Live organization.

Story, Photos and Video
By Jeff M. Hardison © June 19, 2020 at 8:10 a.m.
     CHIEFLAND –
Love, harmony, peace and justice were among the topics during a march, a gathering and a Juneteenth celebration that went from Buie Park to Chiefland City Hall (Hardy R. Dean Sr. Municipal Building), and then back to Buie Park in Chiefland on Friday (June 19) until sunset.



In this video Chiefland Police Chief Scott Anderson says he tells everybody that if they have a problem with one of the police officers under his command, then they should come to his office at the Chiefland Police Department, 14 E. Park Ave., in Chiefland, and speak with him about it. He reminds everyone that all people are human, and everyone makes mistakes. Chief Anderson said he was angry and disgusted by the police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s throat and killed Floyd. Anderson said this puts a mark on all police officers. There are some officers who are bad, Anderson said, but not all law enforcement officers are bad. ‘We don’t have that issue here,’ he said. ‘And as long as I am chief, we are not going to have that issue here. I can guarantee you.’

Juneteenth 2020 in Chiefland Florida HardisonInk.com

Juneteenth 2020 in Chiefland Florida HardisonInk.com
People gather under the shade in front of the Hardy R. Dean Sr. Municipal Building (Chiefland City Hall) on Friday. Chiefland City Hall is closed Fridays. This get-together that lasted through high noon on Friday included several people sharing sage advice with one another.

Juneteenth 2020 in Chiefland Florida HardisonInk.com
Pastor Lance Hayes prepares to walk from Buie Park to City Hall. Hayes was among the keynote speakers of the day. He is a candidate in the race for Chiefland City Commission, where he is facing Tim West, who seeks reelection.

Juneteenth 2020 in Chiefland Florida HardisonInk.com
(from left) Alice Monyei, Liz Carnegie and Cassy Carnegie are at a table next to the route people took to walk from Buie Park to Chiefland City Hall on June 19. These voters appear to prefer one candidate for President – Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic candidate.

Juneteenth 2020 in Chiefland Florida HardisonInk.com
The Rev. Donnell Sanders listens as Chiefland Police Chief Scott Anderson speaks.


     Juneteenth is a holiday celebrating the liberation of those who had been held as slaves in the United States.
     Originating in Texas, it is now celebrated annually on June 19 throughout the United States. It commemorates Union Army Gen. Gordon Granger announcing federal orders in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, proclaiming that all people held as slaves in Texas were free.
     Slavery in the United States was the legal institution of human chattel enslavement, primarily of Africans that existed in the United States of America from the beginning of the nation in 1776 until passage of the Thirteenth Amendment in 1865.
     The end of slavery resulted after The Emancipation Proclamation, or Proclamation 95, which was a presidential proclamation and executive order issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln on Sept. 22, 1862, and effective as of Jan. 1, 1863.
     The event celebrating Juneteenth in Chiefland included some very thoughtful speeches on the front lawn of City Hall. Other than police, fire and other essential employees, the Chiefland city government workers do not work on Friday, Saturday or Sunday. Hence the building was closed.

Juneteenth 2020 in Chiefland Florida HardisonInk.com
The Rev. Donnell Sanders (left) listens as Al Carnegie Sr. speak to the people.

     After the march from Buie Park to City Hall, the speaking session there opened with a prayer and then a word to the people by the Rev. Donnell Sanders, pastor of Antioch Baptist Church in Fort White (Columbia County).
     Levy County NAACP President Al Carnegie Sr. said he is thankful for evangelist Bobbie Scott and Rutha Scott for all they have done to help the Tri-County Area through the years to fight for civil rights. Carnegie and other speakers mentioned several people who have been part of the progress in this part of Florida regarding civil rights.
     Carnegie said he came to the Chiefland area in 1994 when he placed the Carnegie Funeral Home in this city.
     He saw injustice in Chiefland then, and he shared his opinion that it was a hard fight to reach the point where the city is today.
     Carnegie and other speakers had messages for the younger members of the crowd at the front of the Hardy R. Dean Sr. Building. Dean was a beloved Chiefland city manager, for whom the former bank was named to memorialize.
     Carnegie urged blacks to stop killing each other. He implored everyone to learn how to work together in love and kindness.
     After a person pulls the trigger and the bullet leaves the gun, Carnegie said, that cannot be undone.
     Instead of fighting by using bullets, Carnegie said, utilize words. Speak to reporters at news media outlets, he said. The pen is mightier than the sword, he said, to bring change. Elected officials prefer not to see how their inaction or improper action has led to death and destruction, rather than peace and progress.
     Another method Carnegie strongly endorsed is to vote to “get the evil people out and put the good people in” of elected offices.
     Carnegie repeated a truth he learned from his decades of working in the embalming room of a funeral parlor. Other than the outer color of people’s skin, everything else is the same in all people. All people are human beings. All people bleed red blood.
      Carnegie took a verse from the Gospel and brought it into today’s vernacular.
     In Matthew 7:12, King James Version, Jesus says “Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.”
     Carnegie shared this concept with reference to a recent murder of a man by a police officer.
     “If you don’t want people to put that knee to your neck,” Carnegie said, “then you don’t put your knee to nobody else’s neck. If you don’t want somebody to take your kid out of the car, slam him on the ground and bump him about the head, then don’t you do it to nobody.”
     Carnegie said people must let The Holy Spirit enter them, rather than letting “self” and anger get into them to do something they will forever regret. Anger leads to destruction.
     The Levy County NAACP meets every first Thursday, starting at 7 p.m. in Bronson Church of God by Faith, 360 Glover Street. Carnegie said the NAACP is available to help.

Juneteenth 2020 in Chiefland Florida HardisonInk.com
Daphina Williams speaks about an organization named ‘Don’t Take My Life. Let Me Live.’ As a licensed funeral director, she has seen too many dead black men who lost their lives from bullets. She spoke about a couple of her sons, too.

     Daphina Williams, a licensed funeral director and owner of D. Williams Mortuary Services of Gainesville, also spoke to the people.
     Williams, a graduate of Williston High School’s Class of 1989, and the mother of five, spoke about two of her sons. One is in prison, and if he could have 30 seconds of time back, and if he had put that gun down, then he would not be in prison, she said. But that revision of events is not possible.
     “My eyes got full of water, because I felt those 30 seconds,” she said. Williams told listeners about how she was affected when her son told the judge that he would not do what he did if he had that time to relive over.
     She said peer pressure and associating with the wrong people leads some young men down a path of ruin. A bell that has rung cannot be unrung.
     Meanwhile, one of her children of whom she is proud was videotaping the program that very Friday afternoon. Marquis Graham served in the military and continues to be a contributing member of society, his mother said.
     She told the young people in the audience to make a change. To do that, however, Williams said, they need to show respect to all people. Don’t wear pants that are not pulled up, she said.
     Williams is part of an organization named “Don’t Take My Life. Let Me Live.”
     When she was working on a body of a young man who was shot at a Waffle House in Gainesville, she thought “Nearer my God to thee. Why are black men doing what they are doing to each other?”
     Williams went on to say her heart bled for the family of the man who pulled the trigger to end the victim’s life as well. She explained how two families mourned.
     “Not only are we burying the one who was shot,” she said, “but we are losing another brother, because he is going to be incarcerated for years.”
     Two weeks later, Williams was working on another victim of a fatal shooting – this time from Cross City, and it was over a credit card. A credit card, Williams said as the stark reality must have struck some listeners. She looked at the man’s lifeless body and saw that this man was the same age as one of her sons.
     Don't Take My Life, Let Me Live Movement Inc. is a Florida Domestic Non-Profit Corporation, which filed on Feb. 18, 2018, with the Office of the Florida Secretary of State, according to records. It is based in Miami.
     Each person makes choices. Sometimes, parents have to make decisions that are heartrending, she said.
     The biggest choice she had to make in her life, William said, was to revoke the bond of her son who was out of jail on bond. She had seen too much death and destruction from criminal activity.
     Williams said she had tears in her eyes when the judge asked if she was certain about this action, and she said “Yes.” By revoking his bond, she said, this increased his odds of living long enough to have a second chance by turning his life around.
     Williams said everyone needs to respect the police officers in Chiefland. They go into situations where they could be facing a crazy person who opens fire on them, she said. One of her brothers-in-law is a retired Florida Highway Patrol trooper now, she said.
     Each time he went out on duty, she said, his family did not know if he would return home. People need to respect the police, she said. And the law enforcement officers, she added, must respect civilians as well.
     Williams asked people to put positive messages on social media to encourage police officers. If one person does something wrong, then make that one accountable, she said.
     Williams introduced Chiefland Police Chief Scott Anderson.
     While many of the speakers “went long” with their messages, Chief Anderson was concise.
     Anderson tells everybody that if they have a problem with one of the police officers under his command, then they need to come to his office at the Chiefland Police Department, at 14 E. Park Ave., sand speak to him about it.
     The chief reminds everyone that all people are human, and everyone makes mistakes.
     Anderson became angry and disgusted by the police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s throat and killed Floyd, he said. Anderson said this puts a mark on all police officers. There are some officers who are bad, he said, but not all.
     “We don’t have that issue (systemic racial injustice) here,” Anderson said. “And as long as I am chief, we are not going to have that issue here. I can guarantee you.”

Juneteenth 2020 in Chiefland Florida HardisonInk.com
Mayor Chris Jones motions to the south in Chiefland as he speaks about county-maintained roads that need attention.

     Chiefland Mayor Chris Jones spoke next.
     Rather than joining the fray of people who spread rumors and gossip, as well as feeding the hate-mongering and making unsubstantiated attacks against others on Facebook or other social media outlets, Mayor Jones intimated, go to public meetings of municipalities and counties. Show up with several people and redress the government with grievances.
      Make your voice heard, Jones said. For the people on the south side of Chiefland who have county-maintained roads that are in disrepair, Jones said, should go to County Commission meetings and let those leaders hear their request for help.
     Mayor Jones said the City Commission has been awarded Community Development Block Grants over the years to improve the city, including Buie Park and Strickland Park. To achieve that, he said, city management, city staff and the City Commission all work hard together.
     Another relatively recently funded improvement to Chiefland is the access road that runs parallel to U.S. Highway 19 on the east side of the highway.
     To know the dates, times and place of the Levy County Board of County Commissioners meetings, please call the Board Office at 352-486-5218. To learn about most government organizations’ meeting dates, it is best to visit their websites.
     The City of Williston even has an advertisement on HardisonInk.com to show the place and times of its City Council meetings.
     Among the many things Mayor Jones said was that any person can accomplish anything, if he or she sets his or her mind to it. He dreamed of racing motorcycles. He did what he needed and raced in competition with other fast motorcycle enthusiasts.
     At first, Jones did not win, he said. In time, by learning more, he earned three national championships as a motorcycle racer. Now he owns a high performance motorcycle shop in Chiefland. Jones considers himself to be of mixed race origin. He said children of both races mistreated him at times when he was young.
     That did not stop him from achieving his dreams, nonetheless. Jones said no black child should believe that he or she can’t achieve whatever any white child can achieve.


Juneteenth 2020 in Chiefland Florida HardisonInk.com
Pastor Lance Hayes speaks to the people as Marquis Graham and others capture Hayes’ likeness and voice on video-recording devices.

     Pastor Lance Hayes of Potter House Exalting of Chiefland, one of the founding forces for the first ever Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Love March in Chiefland, was another speaker at the event Friday afternoon in Chiefland.
     To read a story with pictures and video, which includes pastor Hayes, click HERE.
     Hayes is running for the Chiefland City Commission seat occupied by Tim West now. The man who gets the most votes in that election, West or Hayes, will be working for the residents and visitors of Chiefland as a city commissioner after that election.
     Only Chiefland residents are qualified to vote in that election.
     As Hayes began speaking to the people, he recited part of
     Hebrews 12:14. “Follow peace with all men,” Hayes said.
     The rest of the verse goes “and holiness, without which no man shall see the Lord.”
     With all that was done with protests, and today’s action, Hayes said, “Where do we go from here?”
     Hayes answered his question in part, by adding that change must take place.
     “I am convinced that change is already on the horizon,” Hayes continued.
     While the systematic racial injustice that causes some events in more metropolitan cities are not plaguing Chiefland, Hayes sees some underlying issues.
     Hayes said the people can approach the government in peace as they seek justice.
     However, he added, all the while the chant is “No Justice. No Peace.”
     All lives matter, Hayes said. Black lives matter, Hayes added.
     “We want to get people off of our neck,” Hayes said.
     He added that it is not only white people who are on the necks of the black people.
     “Sometimes,” Hayes said, “We hold our own selves down.”
     And the people said, “Amen.”
     Hayes suggests that all people get off of each other’s necks; so that all people can breathe.
     And the people said, “Amen.”
     Hayes urged listeners to go to government meetings to watch how the legislators make their decisions regarding the good of the community.
     “Let’s not put negative things on Facebook, and down our police chief and sheriff and all that kind of stuff,” Hayes said. “Everything they do, we are not going to always agree with it. But bring it to the table. Alright!
     “See what we can do as we come together,” Hayes continued, “and come up with strategies to make change take place. It’s all about change. Alright! We cannot get in a time machine. Nobody can do that and end slavery, or all of that. We can’t go back and undo the Jim Crow laws. All of that is done and over with now.”
     Hayes went on to say that this is a new day and a new time for change.
     Stop hammering each other down, Hayes said, as the area grows into a more diverse community where people help one another.
     “Where there is unity,” Hayes said, “There is strength. I have lived long enough to find that is so. That is true. Alright! Let’s keep the dream of Martin Luther King alive. Let’s keep each other alive. Let’s work together. Let’s encourage each other. And let’s do this all in peace. God bless you all.”  
     In addition to Carnegie, Williams, Hayes, Jones and Sanders, there were many other speakers and active people helping the whole Juneteenth event in Chiefland.
     This event is said to have been the vision of Raven Donald. Others who helped included Gussie Boatright, Pastor Kenuel Gates, Alice Monyei, other members of the Carnegie family and a long, long list of other supporters.
     The person listed as the presider at the event at Buie Park, from 1 p.m. to sunset on Friday was Jazz Davis.

 


3-2 vote shows town
moving toward
city manager format

Bronson Town Council  HardisonInk.com
Seen here are (seated, from left) Town Councilman Berlon Weeks, Vice Mayor Jason Hunt, Mayor Beatrice Roberts, Town Councilman Aaron Edmondson and Town Councilman Robert Partin. A visiting videographer is standing and recording. This photo is taken from a video that was made during the public comment part of the Monday night (June 15) meeting at the Dogan Cobb Municipal Building. At the podium is Al Carnegie, who questioned what action resulted from complaints by employees against Berlon Weeks. He was told there were cameras installed that capture video and audio in Town Hall. Carnegie also took issue with what he perceived from alleged Facebook posts from Vice Mayor Jason Hunt. Hunt has since deactivated his Facebook account, thereby removing any memes or comments he made before. Town Attorney Stephen Warm said the people can petition for a recall initiative of a Town Council member as a ballot issue if people want to take that action. Mayor Beatrice Roberts has no power over any other Town Council member’s expression of opinions on social media. All individuals’ expressions of opinions are protected equally by The First Amendment. During his statements, Carnegie, who perceived Hunt’s commentary as being bigoted, reminded everyone that regardless of skin color, all humans have the same color of red blood. Carnegie, a funeral home owner and a member of the NAACP, said he wants the people of Levy County to strive against feeling bigotry in their hearts and minds.

Photo Taken From Video Provided As A Courtesy By The Town Of Bronson

By Jeff M. Hardison © June 16, 2020 at 4:10 p.m.
     BRONSON –
A 3-2 split vote Monday night (June 15) in Bronson is causing Town Attorney Steven Warm to start the process that may lead to the town being a town manager form of government rather than its current “Commission – Weak Mayor” form.
     Voting in favor of the action were Vice Mayor Jason Hunt and town councilmen Berlon Weeks and Robert Partin. Voting against it were Mayor Beatrice Roberts and Town Councilman Aaron Edmonson.
     After a workshop meeting the previous Tuesday night (June 9), Town Attorney Warm sent the Town Council members an elaboration of the town manager methods.
     In one version, the Town Council would appoint a person to be the manager. Appointing a person to manage the town, Warm noted, however would not amend the manner in which the town operates now.
     Instead, to achieve a goal of not having a clerk needing to respond to the whims of five different leaders, the town charter would have to be revised. That revision could occur via the voters on a referendum question for that purpose, Warm said in his notes.
     According to Linda Cooper, a Williston area resident who was at the meeting, former Town Clerk Shirley Miller told her that she resigned because it is impossible to serve under five different bosses with directions that on occasion are contrary with one another.
     Weeks made a motion to instruct Warm to draft material showing a job description of the Bronson city manager. The motion was seconded by Vice Mayor Hunt with Partin voting in favor and Mayor Roberts and Town Councilman Edmondson voting against it.
     At some point, the potential exists for a referendum choice by voters to revise the method of government used for the day-to-day operations in Bronson.
     Meanwhile, as the town considers how the clerk or deputy clerk, or no clerk, would serve the town while the city manager directs operations, the town currently has no town clerk.
     Deputy Town Clerk Melisa Cook and Utilities Administration Clerk Nikki Keller are currently absorbing the duties of the town clerk.
     On another matter, after Mayor Robertson said former Town Councilwoman Harriet Wilson is heralding her 100th birthday on June 25, Councilman Partin made a motion to name June 25 as Harriet Wilson Day in Bronson, and that a plaque be made and presented to Wilson for her dedication to the town.
     Partin’s motion was seconded by Edmondson and met with unanimous vote of approval.
     Wilson is known as one of the town leaders who helped bring what is known now as James H. Cobb Park into existence.
     Robbie Blake of Bronson, Wilson and three other women are credited with having taken the action needed to create the park, which was later renamed to honor a town employee who died while in service to the residents and visitors of Bronson.
     The other women who helped start the park are former Mayor Edith Brown, Ada Marie Keeton and Nancy Bell of Chiefland, a former Levy County Commission member.

 


August and November elections
show voters opportunities
to decide in Tri-County Area;

Some races are decided already
By Jeff M. Hardison © June 12, 2020 at 3:10 p.m.
     TRI-COUNTY AREA –
The list of candidates in races for offices in the Tri-County Area of Levy, Dixie and Gilchrist counties -- Dixie, Gilchrist and Levy counties -- and in the Third Judicial Circuit, Eighth Judicial Circuit, 21st State House of Representatives District, 22nd State House of Representatives District and the Fifth District of the Florida Senate reflects two chances for voters to make final decisions on which humans will serve them in various capacities.
     Many of the local races will be decided in August, because when the candidates are of the same party – in these instances Republicans – then anyone can vote for them. This universal primary, too, will be the deciding point in those elections.
     In the Tri-County Area, also, several candidates have been reelected as a result of no opposition as of today (Friday, June 12), according to records.
     Following is the lineup as of June 12, according to information from the websites of Dixie County Supervisor of Election Starlet Cannon, Gilchrist County Supervisor of Elections Connie D. Sanchez, Levy County Supervisor of Elections Tammy Jones and Florida Secretary of State Laurel M. Lee.
     As noted, some political races will be decided via the ballots cast in August, and some political races will be decided via the ballots cast in November. Registered voters can choose to participate in either, both or neither voting opportunity.
     People who failed to register in time, will not have those opportunities. People who registered to vote, but who do not vote may complain if the person they prefer to win does not win, but perhaps they will realize that every votes counts – and they could have been the voter who made the difference.


Dixie County
     Following is a list of the incumbent office-holder and the individuals who have filed their intent to run for that office, according to information from Dixie County Supervisor of Elections Starlet Cannon’s website.
DEM = Democrat
REP = Republican
NPA = No Party Affiliation
NP = Nonpartisan Office
Incumbent = Current Office Holder, not everyone is seeking reelection
~
Clerk of Court and Comptroller Dana Johnson (Incumbent)
Barbara "Barbie" Higginbotham (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Christie K. Johnson (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
Jaime L. NesSmith (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
     All three candidates are competing in November.

Sheriff Dewey Hatcher Sr. (Incumbent)
Michael James Brannin (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Darby Butler (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
Nicholas Ryan Hatcher (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
Jamey Michael King (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
     All four candidates are competing in November.

Property Appraiser Robert A. Lee (Incumbent)
Robert A. “Robbie” Lee (NPA) (Unopposed)

Tax Collector Michelle Fowler Cannon (Incumbent)
Michelle Fowler Cannon (NPA) (Unopposed)

Superintendent of Schools Michael Aaron Thomas (Incumbent)
Michael Aaron Thomas (REP) (Unopposed)

Supervisor of Elections Starlet Cannon (Incumbent)
Starlet Cannon (REP) (Unopposed)

Board of County Commissioners
Dist. 1
Wade E. “Gene” Higginbotham (Incumbent)
Gerald R. Montgomery (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
Paul “Jody” Stephenson (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
     This race is set to be decided in November.

Dist. 3 Mark Hatch (Incumbent)
Mark Hatch (REP) (Active-Incumbent)
John P. Jenkins (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
     This race is set to be decided in November.

Dist. 5 David D. Osteen (Incumbent)
Martin C. Barber Jr. (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
David D. Osteen (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
Keith Reed (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
James T. Valentine (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
     This race is set to be decided in November.

School Board
Dist. 1
Crystal Bush (Incumbent)
Crystal M. Bush (NP) (Active-Qualified)
Cheryl C. Pridgeon (NP) (Active-Qualified)
Samantha C. Sanders (NP) (Active-Qualified)
     This race is set to be decided in August in the primary, where it will be on all ballots because it is a non-partisan race.

Dist. 4 Timothy W. Alexander (Incumbent)
Timothy W. Alexander (NP) (Unopposed)

County Judge Jennifer Jones Johnson (Incumbent)
Jennifer Jones Johnson (NP) (Unopposed)


Gilchrist County
     Following is a list of the incumbent office-holder and the individuals who have filed their intent to run for that office, according to information from Gilchrist County Supervisor of Elections Connie Sanchez’s website.
DEM = Democrat
REP = Republican
NPA = No Party Affiliation
NP = Nonpartisan Office
Incumbent = Current Office Holder, not everyone is seeking reelection

Sheriff Robert D. "Bobby" Schultz III (Incumbent)
Robert D. "Bobby" Schultz III (REP) (Unopposed)

Clerk of Circuit Court Todd Newton (Incumbent)
Todd Newton (REP) (Unopposed)

Property Appraiser Damon C. Leggett (Incumbent)
Damon C. Leggett (REP) (Unopposed)

Tax Collector Michael E. McElroy (Incumbent-Appointed)
Michael E. McElroy (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Terry E. Trail (REP) (Active-Qualified)
     This race is set to be decided in August, because both candidates are Republicans. It is a universal primary. Democrats and other party or non-party voters will see this race on their August ballots.

Supervisor of Elections Connie Sanchez (Incumbent)
Connie Sanchez (REP) (Unopposed)

Superintendent of Schools Rob Rankin (Incumbent)
Ronda Adkins (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Cheri Anne Brodeur (REP) (Active-Qualified)
James A. Surrency (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Kevin L. Whitaker (REP) (Active-Qualified)
     This race is set to be decided in August, because all four candidates are Republicans. It is a universal primary. Democrats and other party or non-party voters will see this race on their August ballots.

Board of County Commissioners
Dist. 1
Sharon A. Langford (Incumbent)
Sharon Akins Langford (REP) (Unopposed)

Dist. 3 Todd Gray (Incumbent)
Joseph Daniel Hart Jr. (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Ronald Darrell Smith (REP) (Active-Qualified)
     This race is set to be decided in August, because both candidates are Republicans. It is a universal primary. Democrats and other party or non-party voters will see this race on their August ballots.

Dist. 5 Kenrick D. Thomas (Incumbent)
Kenrick D. Thomas (REP) (Unopposed)

School Board
Dist. 2
Susan P. Owens (Incumbent)
Susan P. Owens (NP) (Unopposed)

Dist 4 Gina L. Geiger (Incumbent)
Gina L. Geiger (NP) (Unopposed)


Levy County
     Following is a list of the incumbent office-holder and the individuals who have filed their intent to run for that office, according to information from Levy County Supervisor of Elections Tammy Jones’ website.
DEM = Democrat
REP = Republican
NPA = No Party Affiliation
NP = Nonpartisan Office
Incumbent = Current Office Holder, not everyone is seeking reelection

Clerk of Court Danny Shipp (Incumbent)
Danny Shipp (REP) (Unopposed)

Property Appraiser Osborn “Oz” Barker (Incumbent)
Osborn “Oz” Barker (REP) (Unopposed)

Sheriff Bobby McCallum (Incumbent)
Bobby McCallum (REP) (Unopposed)

Superintendent of Schools Jeff Edison (Incumbent)
Chris Cowart (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Jeff Edison (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Jerry Lawrence (NPA) (Active-Qualified)
     Cowart and Edison compete in the Republican primary in August to see who faces Lawrence in November. Only Republicans will decide between Cowart and Edison in August. All voters will decide the winner of this race in November.

Supervisor of Elections Tammy Jones (Incumbent)
Tammy Jones (REP) (Unopposed)
 
Tax Collector Linda Fugate (Incumbent)
Sabrina Sheppard (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Michele Langford (REP) (Active-Qualified)
     This race is set to be decided in August, because both candidates are Republicans. It is a universal primary. Democrats and other party or non-party voters will see this race on their August ballots.

Board of County Commissioners
Dist. 1
John Meeks (Incumbent)
John Meeks (REP) (Unopposed)

Dist. 3 Mike Joyner (Incumbent)
Mike Joyner (REP) (Unopposed)

Dist. 5 Matt Brooks (Incumbent)
Matt Brooks (REP) (Unopposed)

School Board
Dist. 2
Chris Cowart (Incumbent)
Darby Allen (NP) (Active-Qualified)
Tammy Boyle (NP) (Active-Qualified)
     This race is set to be decided in August, because both candidates are non-partisan. It is a universal primary. Democrats and other party or non-party voters will see this race on their August ballots.

Dist. 4 Paige Brookins (Incumbent)
Paige Brookins (NP) (Unopposed)


Third Judicial Circuit (Columbia, Dixie, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee and Taylor counties)
State Attorney
Jeffrey Alan Siegmeister of Live Oak, Republican (Incumbent-Retired Early)
Acting Appointed State Attorney David Phelps
     Active Candidates
John F. Durrett (Rep.) (Active-Qualified)
Christina Nieto “Tina” Seifert (Rep.) (Active-Qualified)

Public Defender
M. Blair Payne (Incumbent)
     Active Candidates
Clifton "Cliff" William Wilson Jr. (Unopposed)

Third Judicial Circuit Court Judges
The Hon. Greg Parker (Unopposed)
The Hon. Mark E. Feagle (Unopposed)
The Hon. Leandra G. Johnson (Unopposed)


Eighth Judicial Circuit (Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Gilchrist, Levy, and Union counties)
State Attorney
William Cervone (Incumbent)
     Active Candidates
Brian Kramer (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Beverly R. McCallum (DEM) (Active-Qualified)

Public Defender
Stacy Ann Scott (DEM)
Stacy Ann Scott (DEM) (Unopposed)

Eighth Judicial Circuit Court Judges
The Hon. Robert Kirk Groeb (Unopposed)
The Hon. Phillip Andrew Pena (Unopposed)
The Hon. Craig C. DeThomasis (Unopposed)
The Hon. William E. Davis (Unopposed)

State Rep. Dist. 21 (Dixie County, Gilchrist County, western Alachua County)
Charles Wesley “Chuck” Clemons Sr. (Incumbent)
     Active Candidates
Charles Wesley “Chuck” Clemons Sr. (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Kayser Enneking (DEM) (Active-Qualified)

State Rep. Dist. 22 (Levy County and western Marion County)
Charlie Stone of Ocala, Republican (Incumbent)
     Active Candidates
Barbara Byram (DEM) (Active-Qualified)
Joe B. Harding (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Floyd Russell Randall (REP) (Active-Qualified)

State Sen. Dist. 5 (Levy, Dixie, Gilchrist, Baker, Bradford, Clay, Columbia, Lafayette, Suwannee, Union and part of Marion counties)
Robert “Rob” Bradley of Fleming Island, Republican (Incumbent)
     Active Candidates
Melina Rayna Svanhild Farley-Barratt (DEM) (Active-Qualified)
Jennifer Bradley (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Jason G. Holifield (REP) (Active-Qualified)
Matthew “Matt” Charles McCary (Libertarian Party of Florida) (Active)

 


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--UPDATED--
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