CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ADS AT BOTTOM OF PAGE
CLICK HERE


Cedar Key Summer Youth Program
offers safe, extraordinary, meaningful
fun and tasty experiences


Cedar Key Vice Mayor Sue Colson begins the process to cook shrimp donated by Steamer’s Clam Bar & Grill. Children are enjoying aquacultural science lessons this year. Colson is doing a lot of the cooking.

Story and Photos
By Jeff M. Hardison © June 20, 2017 at 9:37 p.m.
     CEDAR KEY
– Every happy ending has to have a beginning.
     And so it is with the happy evolution of the Summer Youth Program in Cedar Key, which is now at a high point.

 

MORE BELOW THIS AD




     For at least the past 40 years, the City of Cedar Key has provided some form of a Summer Youth Program, Cedar Key Vice Mayor Sue Colson said Monday (June 19).
     Except for last year – when the turnaround to improve the program began – for the past 10 to 15 years, this summer program was more of a daycare service than a summer program, Vice Mayor Colson said.
     She felt that it did not provide enough of a meaningful experience for the children. It seemed to be lacking a certain something.
     Back then, she said, the children may have felt like they were just stuck in the Cedar Key School Gym.
     During some summer days in the past decade or so, the weather became too hot, and without air-conditioning (no public school gyms in Levy County have air-conditioning) that presented issues. Some children suffered from the heat to the extent that they became ill, suffering from heat exhaustion and showing symptoms, such as vomiting.
     Back before last year’s start of the reformation of the Summer Youth Program, the children only had the gym and one small classroom – to fit upwards of 80 children, Colson said. The city leaders and others worked to overcome that.
     Last year, the children used the Cedar Key Community Center, Colson said.
     With many Cedar Key parents who work for a living during the weekdays, Colson knows there is a need to provide their children with a safe environment so those children can enjoy summer.
     Starting last year, the program began to improve.
     Last year, the Cedar Keys Audubon group worked with the children so they could learn about bird rescues, Colson said. They learned about shorebirds and other aspects of island wildlife.
     The theme last year, she said, was “What lives in your backyard?”
     Colson said she wants the children of Cedar Key to understand that what they see as their normal, everyday habitat is as special as it is. Since they live in this environment, they may not fully appreciate what surrounds them, she said. People come to Cedar Key from other places, in part, to enjoy the natural beauty of the flora and fauna on this set of islands connected by bridges.
     And so, “without shoving science down their throats,” Colson’s idea for the Cedar Key Summer Youth Program this year is to help them enjoy even more meaningful, hands-on experiences to better appreciate what envelops them on their home island.


Shrimp on the grill


Live blue crabs in a crate

 
     This summer’s topic is “What do we eat in Cedar Key? And what does it eat?” Colson said.
     The program includes lessons and hands-on experiences with alligators, mullet, grouper, shrimp, blue crabs, clams, oysters, lobster and other marine life to be studied and in most cases eaten.
     Monday (June 19) was National Lobster Day, Colson said, and she even had lobster for the children to eat.
     During the first week of camp, the children had an opportunity to enjoy Sturgeon eggs – caviar, Colson said. They learned about this particular prehistoric fish that continues to thrive in this part of Florida today.
     In the preliminary stages of creating the curriculum for this summer, Colson was speaking with Hannah Healey of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. In that discussion, Colson suggested to Healey that the FWC might consider reinstituting its program where children are given fishing poles and reels, and they learn the rules about fishing in Florida.
     While the Colson-proposed rods and reels gift concept has not reached fruition yet, there are fishing lessons on the horizon.
     The children will be using cast nets on Wednesday (June 21) as a local mullet fisherman – Chad O’Steen – shows them how to catch that type of fish, if all goes as planned. The weather changes plans on occasion. Last Tuesday, the FWC had a potential to take some of the children on kayak adventures, but the Gulf was too rough, Colson said.
     As for fishing, the children are making plastic fish out of water bottles, Colson said, and they will try to “catch” the fish using nets, according to the current lesson plan for that part of that day.
     Bud Collins will be the man to teach the children about crabbing, Colson said, as she mentioned the help for this summer program is bountiful.
     Every Wednesday morning, the youthful summer program participants get to visit the Cedar Key Public Library, Colson said, as they are reminded of another asset that exists for them on this set of islands.
     Next Wednesday (June 28), Anna White Hodges is coming to sing, and to read her hurricane book, Colson said.
     The book helps children not to fear hurricanes, but to be aware of them.
     The American Red Cross is sending a person to teach children how to “pack your pillowcase,” Colson said, in a storm event – “for kids to be prepared. How timely is that?”
     Every Thursday, there is an out-of-town field trip. The final one of those is noted to be at a bowling alley.  
     Healey showed Colson a booklet used to help young students learn about agriculture and aquaculture.


The truck and the car on the cover of this book are characters in the storyline that runs through it. The title of the booklet is Drive Through Florida, Aquaculture and Seafood, A Florida Agriculture Day Book.

     The title of the booklet is Drive Through Florida, Aquaculture and Seafood, A Florida Agriculture Day Book.
     It was created for students to learn about Florida Agriculture Day, which was last month.
     This is a children’s non-fiction book about Florida’s Agriculture. Aquaculture is a very important segment of Florida agriculture. According to economic analysis by Dr. Allan Hodges, the direct impact of the aquaculture industry in Florida includes almost 18,000 jobs and has more than $1.2 billion in economic impact.
    Florida commercial fisheries and aquaculture industries includes a wide variety of shellfish and finfish harvested from the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean; as well as aquaculture products including tropical fish, alligator, oysters and clams, and aquatic plants.
    Cedar Key is so well known for its clam crop, that it is highlighted in the book for that.
     Using this booklet as a centerpiece for forming lesson plans and activities, the summer of fun is off to a grand start.
     The children have already learned about alligators.
     H. Franklin Percival, Ph.D., came to help the campers learn about this reptile. Dr. Percival is a courtesy associate professor at the University of Florida’s Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department.
     Every child was able to hold a live baby alligator and have their picture taken with it. That program last week, provided those pictures for Fathers’ Day gifts.
     Then, Colson said, the day campers had an opportunity to enjoy some cooked farm-raised alligator tail.


The youngest one-third of the summer program's participants wave as they go in an orderly fashion toward a beachline outdoor laboratory.


Kate Hellgren of the UF Nature Coast Biological Station at Cedar Key teaches children about marine animals.


Hunter Burney, standing, is a volunteer from Gainesville. He is a University of Florida student. Leaning down toward a bucket is 15-year-old fellow summer program participant Trey Stanfield, who is assisting Hellgren as a volunteer,


Kate Hellgren holds a clear container up to show the children a puffer fish and some other marine species that were collected from the water next to the beach where they are standing on Monday.


     On Monday (June 19) Kate Hellgren, a Florida Master Naturalist Program Coordinator with the UF Nature Coast Biological Station at Cedar Key, asked the children about alligators. This learning process of reciting what was learned in a previous experience reinforces that first lesson.
     There were three groups of campers visiting with Hellgren, Hunter Burney, a 21-year-old volunteer from Gainesville and Trey Stanfield, a 15-year-old camper who volunteered to help that day.
     When the youngest children were at the beachside, Hellgren reminded them of what alligators do with their feet, tails, claws and teeth, by prompting them with questions and then listening to their answers.
     Hellgren asked the children if they enjoyed eating alligator tail last week. All of the children said they did. One girl mentioned that she did not like “Sturgeon eggs” however, and Hellgren reminded her that food is called caviar.
     The educator spoke about habitat. Children said air, water, food and shelter are among the first necessary factors needed for survival of any species in any habitat. Hellgren then showed the children some live marine creatures that had been collected using a seine net near that beach, which is to the east of the school.
     Monday (June 19) heralded the start of the second week of this five-week summer program. This year’s program has attained a pinnacle of fun, food and memorable experiences.
     This summer’s program is far and away the best ever, Vice Mayor Colson intimated.
     The Cedar Key Summer Youth Program this year includes an exciting curriculum reflective of Cedar Key aquaculture and more.
     This year, the key to success is found in a formula where there is a joint effort put forth by City of Cedar Key, Cedar Key School, the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (especially the UF Nature Coast Biological Station at Cedar Key), the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
     Another few elements helping the children this summer are donations from some local business interests – like Steamer’s Clam Bar & Grill, which donated shrimp for lunch on Monday; and donations by private people.
     Three fishing guides volunteered to take some of the older children out to fish for grouper. The program this summer includes children from kindergarten through next fall’s twelfth graders.
     This extraordinary program is very inexpensive.
     The parents pay a mere $20 all-together per child to participate in this Summer Youth Program. It runs from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday, for five weeks from June 12 to July 12.
     That $20 is the whole price for the five-week program, which includes field trips on boats, to a bowling alley (at the end), and it includes all of those lunches, guest speakers and everything else.


Children play indoor games like foosball, air hockey and pool. In the background, Cedar Key Police Sgt. David Perry watches the children and interacts with them.


     Not only are the children enjoying a theme-oriented, meaningful, hands-on, educational experience, but there are games like pool, air hockey and foosball available in the multi-purpose auditorium at Cedar Key School.
     Cedar Key Police Sgt. David Perry, who is the School Resource Officer at Cedar Key School, is helping with the summer program too.
     Sgt. Perry said the children also get to enjoy fun games in the gym, including kickball and basketball.
     The other adult helpers include Patty Shewey, Telicia Winfield, Lisa Custer and James Custer.


Cedar Key School Principal Joshua Slemp in his office on Monday.

     CKS Principal Joshua Slemp has been extremely supportive of the improved Cedar Key Summer Youth Program, Colson said. She is very grateful for Principal Slemp’s help.
     “So it is working,” Colson said. “This has become a city extravaganza. I don’t think any children in the state of Florida are getting any kind of curriculum like this, with this level of cooperation -- with what we could cobble together.”
     The vice mayor said the University of Florida’s participation has been phenomenal. The FWC and every group that has been approached has been cooperative to make this succeed as well, she said.
     “It’s just fabulous,” Colson said. “The children of Cedar Key are learning what each critter eats. They are learning some science. I just don’t know how a program could improve on this.”
     Mayor Heath Davis and the entire Cedar Key City Commission join Vice Mayor Colson in being very pleased to see the progress made this year to the summer set of activities for island children.
     While some number of the past years may not have included the ultimate best summer programs in Cedar Key, this one is a great one. As Leigh Bingham Nash of Sixpence None the Richer sings "But tension is to be loved when it is like a passing note to a beautiful, beautiful chord." (The lyrics to Tension Is A Passing Note were written by Matthew Preston Slocum.)  

Levy County Public Library
Summer Program sees
phenomenal success


Ninja Turtle and Wonder Woman are superheroes at the Luther Callaway Public Library in Chiefland on Friday (June 16) as the Levy County Public Library Summer Reading Program completes its first week. Levy County Public Library Youth Services Coordinator Jenny Rodgers and Assistant Jennifer Becker are the people helping children learn this summer with a theme of ‘Build A Better World.’

Photo by Jeff M. Hardison © June 16, 2017 at 4:47 p.m.


Story and Photos
By Jeff M. Hardison © June 16, 2017
     LEVY COUNTY --
Wrapping up the first of seven weeks of entertainment, education, fun and food, the Levy County Public Library System on Friday (June 16) provided about 80 children with a chance to hear from Wonder Woman at the Luther Callaway Public Library in Chiefland.



Parents, grandparent, guardians and other helpers assist children in the craft area as other children listen to Wonder Woman speak to them about helping others.

 

     Of those 80 children, 51 were from a Chiefland daycare.
     Joining Wonder Woman at the library in Chiefland was Ninja Turtle.  
     The summer reading programs in Levy County’s five different public libraries are at 10 a.m. each day, and the programs rotate from library to library. There is an ad on the Calendar Page with information about the programs.
     The overall theme in the programs being presented this summer in the reading program by Levy County Public Library Youth Services Coordinator Jenny Rodgers and Assistant Jennifer Becker is "Build A Better World."


Youth Services Assistant Jennifer Becker sports the Super Librarian logo on her shirt, as well as (below) wears the Super Librarian cape.



     The first week which featured superheroes opened at Williston Public Library in Monday with Wonder Woman and Spiderman. Thirty children and a number of parents, grandparents and guardians enjoyed that day.
     On Tuesday, Wonder Woman was joined by Batman at the Bronson Public Library. Fifty-six children participated in that summer reading program.
     On Wednesday, Wonder Woman was joined by Captain America to the delight of 71 children at the Cedar Key Public Library.
     On Thursday, Wonder Woman was joined by Iron Man as 10 children participated in the summer reading program at A.F. Knotts Public Library in Yankeetown.


Beth McWilliams and her daughter Pearl McWilliams are seen with crafts at the Luther Callaway Public Library in Chiefland.




Some of the sets of material children received are seen here.


     On Friday, the summer reading program concluded at the Luther Callaway Public Library in Chiefland as it will each week.
     Each program includes special guest presenters, a fun craft, a take home goody bag, and a lunch.
     All of the performers this year are from Capes & Tiaras of Gainesville.
     This year, the Levy County Public Library System has partnered with the Summer Break Spot and Levy County Public Schools to provide each child who is younger than 18 years old with a free lunch to be enjoyed in the library after each program.
     The lunch provided at Chiefland on Friday was peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, Cheetos, mozzarella sticks, mixed berry applesauce, blueberry juice and chocolate milk.
     There was a non-peanut option for children who are allergic to peanuts.
     Children listened to the superheroes read to them, and then explain how to make the world a better place. They said some of the things that make a superhero good are honesty, reading and helping others.
     The crafts on this day were relatively simple sticker applications.
     The goody bags for children included superhero temporary tattoos; superhero coloring sheets; a Build A Better World bookmark; and a coupon for a hamburger at McDonald’s.
     The program next week (June 19-23) is Royal Manners.
     The presenters are from Project Princess, which is a group that visits children hospitals. Among the things children will have the opportunity to learn are how a princess lives and there will be tips on how to practice good manners.
     The performers scheduled for the different Public libraries follows (although characters are subject to change): Monday – Williston, Elsa and Anna; Tuesday – Bronson, Belle and Rapunzel; Wednesday – Cedar Key, Tiana and Moana; Thursday – A.F. Knotts (Yankeetown), Elena and Sophia; and Friday – Luther Callaway (Chiefland), Cinderella and Snow White.


Levy County 4-H conducts
annual awards ceremony


Levy County 4-H Agent Genevieve Mendoza presents Patrick Whitehead with a plaque for his Outstanding Project Book Award – Individual Category. Haley Springs is the other 4-H member who earned a plaque for Outstanding Project Book Award – Individual Category. These plaques are for work that was excellent. Springs is going to be given a Golden Clover award as well, the only Levy County 4-H Club member to earn that this year.

Story and Photos
By Jeff M. Hardison © June 12, 2017 at 11:47 p.m.
     BRONSON --
Thirty members of Levy County 4-H were honored Sunday afternoon at an annual awards ceremony for their success.

     Levy County 4-H Agent Genevieve Mendoza led the program conducted in an auditorium with a stage in Bronson that was formerly part of the old Bronson High School. This building is located in an area now used by Levy County Public Schools for its Levy Learning Academy and for its Exceptional Student Education Department.
     Two 4-H members earned plaques for their individual project books. Haley Springs and Patrick Whitehead are those Levy County 4-H members who received that distinction.
     Springs was the only 4-H member who earned a Gold Clover.


The Levy County 4-H Williston Wranglers Club with their leader Annie Whitehurst are seen here with the County Events Trophy, which they earned on April 7 in the county events competition.


The 4-H Outdoor Adventures Club members, including Club Leader Tom Wolfe are seen on stage with the Project Book Trophy.


(from left) Misti Brice, Sabrina Brice and Madison Brice are the first three members of the Levy 4-H Outdoor Adventures Club called on stage, because the members were called alphabetically.


The Levy 4-H Outdoor Adventures Club, including Club Leader Tom Wolfe are seen on stage with their project books.


Levy County 4-H Club Leader Shawn Royce accepts a gift bag, which included a pin for her years of service, from Levy County 4-H Agent Genevieve Mendoza.


Levy County 4-H Club Leader Mary Carr accepts a gift bag, which included a pin for her years of service, from Levy County 4-H Agent Genevieve Mendoza.


Levy County 4-H Club Leader Tom Wolfe accepts a gift bag, which included a pin for her years of service, from Levy County 4-H Agent Genevieve Mendoza.


Levy County 4-H Leaders (from left) Mary Carr {proudly holding her pin with years of service}, Shawn Royce, Tom Wolfe and Annie Whitehurst are honored for their countless hours and tireless work as adult volunteers who help children learn and experience 4-H.


Jim Carr signs a certificate of accomplishment to honor Brooke Batey for her meeting the standard of excellence in Cooking Master, Horse Project, Poultry Project and Rabbit Project.


Levy County 4-H Agent Genevieve Mendoza


Levy County Extension Director Ed Jennings and UF IFAS Northeast District Extension Director Eric Simonne, Ph.D., stand at the back of the auditorium after the ceremony as people make their way toward the refreshments table.


(from left) Brooke Batey, Aubrey Catlett and Elexis Pinkard hold their member's record books for their work in Bridle Brigade.


(from left) Brooke Batey, Aubrey Catlett and Elexis Pinkard accept a gift from Levy County 4-H Bridle Brigade Club Leader Mary Carr.

~
Brooke Batey, Aubrey Catlett and Elexis Pinkard open their gift boxes to see the buckles presented to them.


Brooke Batey, Aubrey Catlett and Elexis Pinkard show their buckles presented to them as they are joined by Haley Springs, another Bridle Brigade member.


Levy County 4-H Bee Club Members Gilbert Gossett, Arthur Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert hold their record books.


Haley Springs (left) looks at her plaque and Patrick Whitehead holds his plaque and project booklet. Both of these Levy County 4-H members earned these Standard of Excellence awards -- Outstanding Project Book Award – Individual Category.


Levy County 4-H Agent Genevieve Mendoza gives graduating senior Stephanie Guardiola (leftmost) a gift bag as graduating senior Wyatt Pogue, 4-H Program Assistant Brenda Heberling and graduating senior Sabrina Brice are seen at center stage.



(from left) Levy County 4-H Agent Genevieve Mendoza, graduating senior Wyatt Pogue, graduating senior Stephanie Guardiola, graduating senior Sabrina Brice and 4-H Program Assistant Brenda Heberling pause for a photo opportunity during the time when the graduating seniors were honored.


(from left) Levy County 4-H Agent Genevieve Mendoza, Brooke Batey and Mackenzie Henderson prepare to conduct the part of the program to recognize 4-H Program Assistant Brenda Heberling who is retiring at the end of June. Henderson gave a very warm and endearing speech to help the audience understand the impact that the program assistant had on her life.


Levy County 4-H Program Assistant Brenda Heberling (left) holds a plaque presented to her by Mackenzie Henderson which notes the appreciation for the impact Heberling had on Levy County 4-H for 21 years.


Levy County 4-H Program Assistant Brenda Heberling accepts a gift bag presented by Levy County 4-H Agent Genevieve Mendoza as a gift from the Levy County Extension Office in honor of Heberling's service as she stands on the brink of retirement.


Mary Carr and Brenda Heberling prepare to help people enjoy the many fresh fruits, vegetables, salsa and other refreshments after the awards program.


     At the conclusion of the program to honor the children, parents and other volunteers, was recognition by 4-H members for retiring 4-H Program Assistant Brenda Heberling.
     Mendoza said the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is pleased to recognize the 4-H members and leaders who were honored on Sunday.
     Graduating seniors Wyatt Pogue and Sabrina Brice, respectively led the audience in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag and in the 4-H Pledge respectively.
     The Annual Levy County 4-H Awards Recognition went smoothly and lasted about an hour, before being adjourned so that everyone could enjoy the many refreshments and participate in several photo opportunities.
     “On behalf of the Levy County 4-H Council,” Mendoza said as she started the program, “we would like to thank our 4-H families for their continued dedication throughout this past year.”
     4-H is the youth development organization of the University of Florida IFAS Extension and Levy County, she said.
     Before the awards, Mendoza introduced Levy County Extension Director Ed Jennings and UF IFAS Northeast District Extension Director Eric Simonne, Ph.D. Another honored guest who was mentioned was Levy County Commission Chairman John Meeks.
     The 4-H members who accepted awards on Sunday afternoon utilized the skills and knowledge they gained through 4-H to complete their award-winning activity report forms.
     The members also received other project pins and ribbons they earned in the 2015-2016 4-H Year.
     4-H Club leaders Shawn Royce, Mary Carr and Tom Wolfe announced the project book and pin award winners in their groups.
     Royce named the award winners in the Levy 4-H Animal Adventures Club.
     Carr made presentations to the Levy 4-H Bridle Brigade members, and to the Levy 4-H Bee Club.
     Wolfe presented awards to the Levy 4-H Outdoor Adventures members.
     The next awards presented were for the individuals who “went the extra mile and have shown excellence in the work they completed this year.”
     That is when Mendoza called Haley Springs and Patrick Whitehead to the stage.
     They received award for Outstanding Project Book Award – Individual Category. Along with a plaque, the young Ms. Springs will also receive a Gold Clover.
     In regard to the Club Scrapbook Award, Bridle Brigade and Outdoor Adventures turned in a club scrapbook.
     Outdoor Adventures received the scrapbook award.
     The Project Book Trophy went to the 4-H club that earned the most points for project book completions. The winner of the Project Book Trophy was the Outdoor Adventures 4-H Club.
     The County Events Trophy went to the 4-H club that earned the most participation points for the County Events competition held on April 7.  And the winner of the County Events Trophy is the Williston Wranglers 4-H Club.
     The Levy County 4-H club leaders are the best, Mendoza said.
     “Their hard work is the reason for our success,” Mendoza said.
     The following leaders have given of themselves over the past year to serve as our 4-H club leaders: Shawn Royce, Animal Adventures 4-H Club; Jim and Mary Carr, Bridle Brigade and Levy Bee Club; Steve and Jo Sample, Creekside Afterschool and Shooting Stars 4-H Club; Kelly Varnes, Kountry Bumpkins 4-H Club; Paula Kennedy, Kountry Kids 4-H Club; Tom Wolfe, Outdoor Adventures; and Annie Whitehurst, Williston Wranglers 4-H Club.
     Program Assistant Heberling recognized the graduating seniors – Sabrina Brice, Stephanie Guardiola and Wyatt Pogue.
     Mackenzie Henderson and Brooke Batey then took the stage to speak about Heberling retiring.
     Batey represented the 4-H Bridle Brigade and Bee Club.
     Henderson represented the 4-H Outdoor Adventure Club.
     They presented a gift to Heberling for her many years of dedication and service to the 4-H program.
     Following are the clubs and the members who earned pins, ribbons and other recognition:
     SHAWN ROYCE – ANIMAL ADVENTURES
     Gracie Brannin – Entomology – Mealworm Project
     Mattie Brannin – Entomology – Mealworm Project
     Graceanna Engstrom – Entomology – Mealworm Project
     Derek Hudor – Entomology – Mealworm Project
     Lucas Royce – Outdoor Education and Recreation
TOM WOLFE – OUTDOOR ADVENTURES
     Misti Brice – Marine Science and Shooting Sports
     Madison Brice – Marine Science and Shooting Sports
     Sabrina Brice – Marine Science
     Cade Cline - Outdoor Education and Recreation
     Cameron Cuomo – Outdoor Education and Recreation
     Luke Henderson – Outdoor Education and Recreation
     Mackenzie Henderson – Outdoor Education and Recreation and Leadership – Club President
     Casey Owens – Outdoor Education and Recreation
     Michael Owens – Outdoor Education and Recreation
     Lucas Parise-Sage – Outdoor Education and Recreation
     Cade Pogue – Outdoor Education and Recreation and Leadership – Club Secretary
     Wyatt Pogue – Outdoor Education and Recreation
     Kelly Runnels – Outdoor Education and Recreation
     Lila Runnels – Outdoor Education and Recreation
     Emily Tomczak – Outdoor Education and Recreation and Horse Project 
MARY CARR – BRIDLE BRIGADE
     Brooke Batey – Horse, Poultry, Rabbit, and Cooking Master Projects
     Aubrey Catlett – Horse, Poultry, Rabbit, and Cooking Master Projects
     McKenzie Mencer – Horse, Poultry, Rabbit, and Cooking Master Projects
     Monika Mencer – Horse, Poultry, Rabbit, and Cooking Master Projects
     Elexis Pinkard – Horse, Poultry, Rabbit, and Cooking Master Projects
     Haley Springs – Horse, Poultry, Rabbit, and Cooking Master, Gardening, Scrapbooking, Outdoor Education and Recreation, Leadership- Club Secretary and Historian Projects; Gold Clover
BEE CLUB
     Gilbert Gossett – Cooking Master
     Arthur and Matthew Gilbert – Cloverbuds (no pins awarded)
    



Top For Chamber Of Commerce Ads







PLEASE CLICK ON ADS TO GO TO WEBSITES. THANK YOU!

--UPDATED--
TUESDAY  JUNE 27  10:47 a.m.
Levy, Dixie and Gilchrist counties




Click on ads to go to websites.




Ad For Weeks Bail Bods



AdQuitDoc101915









Click on the ad above to go to the CF website for the Levy County campus.













Ad For Putnam Lodge Hotel And Spa  Fine Dining














AdPrintShop2015














 

 



Please Click On The Above Ad To Go To The Archived Stories And Photos.